hot-blooded


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Wikipedia.

hot-blooded

(of a horse) being of thoroughbred stock
References in periodicals archive ?
These events are invariably attended by hot-blooded young adults, and more often than not, they show up in fancy, high-powered vehicles.
So I did a little research and I've come up with possibly the best calendar EVER for all you hot-blooded males, young and old.
The Scottish supporters are hot-blooded like the Turks and Balkans."
And no, hot-blooded blokes, that's not just because if you stay tuned long enough to true Blood, you're likely to catch a glimpse of Anna Paquin's naked body!
WORCESTER - Good news for hot-blooded Foreigner fans: The superstar rock band is coming to Worcester.
The warring managers come face to face on the Villa Park touchline for the first time since the Anfield boss gave up on his bid to sign the England midfielder, and their meeting threatens to be as hot-blooded as today's clash.
Show business newspaper Daily Variety called 'Vicky Cristina' "a sexy, funny divertissement that passes as enjoyably as an idle sunny afternoon in the titular Spanish city" and added the film "is by several degrees more hot-blooded than his (Allen's) usual norm." Allen said he definitely wanted to make the movie funny, but he also saw it as a somewhat tragic tale of people who can't fall in love, others who fall perhaps too deeply for each other, and those who marry for all the wrong reasons.
The lineup includes two new versions of classics: Teatre Romea's hot-blooded version of the 15th-century Tirant Lo Blanc (The White Knight), directed by Calixto Bieito, which had its world premiere last month in Germany; and a Spanish/British collaboration (Mom Produccions/West Yorkshire Playhouse) on a Don Quixote that is also fresh off its September premiere.
Farruquito, a hot-blooded young genius with quick-silver feet and hair-tossing charisma, absolutely owned the stage, while his brother and cousin also mustered blazing footwork and arm flourishes.
In this, the seventh hot-blooded novel of the Vampire Huntress series, the chairman of the Vampire Council is dead and the hunt for revenge is on.
In Eric Jerome Dickey's much-anticipated new novel, CHASING DESTINY (Dutton, $24.95), he weaves a passionate and stylish work about a hot-blooded California vixen, Billie (a.k.a.
As I attempted to understand the depth of this warmth and its seeming contradiction to the hot-blooded anger the Canadians so often roused in their neighbors, I began to see the extent of our cultural misunderstandings.