howe truss

Howe truss

[′hau̇ ‚trəs]
(civil engineering)
A truss for spans up to 80 feet (24 meters) having both vertical and diagonal members; made of steel or timber or both.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

howe truss

A truss having upper and lower horizontal members, between which are vertical and diagonal members; the vertical web members take tension, and the diagonal web members are under compression.
See also: Truss
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

Howe truss

Howe truss
A truss having upper and lower horizontal members, between which are vertical and diagonal members; the vertical members of the web take tension, and the diagonal members are under compression.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is one of only three covered bridges in New York built with the Howe truss design.
The Howe truss was patented in 1840 by American engineer William Howe.
The central five spans, being much longer, are Howe Trusses. Figure 2 shows a typical Howe Truss designed by the New Zealand Public Works Department.
The timber piers supporting the longer Howe truss spans (river spans) consist of 10 piles and the piers supporting the shorter simply supported spans (land spans) and forming the abutment walls consist of five and three piles respectively.
>> See: There are eight historic covered bridges in the region, starting just west of Lancaster village on Route 135 with the Mount Orne Bridge, a Howe truss dating from 1911.
The original design of William Howe, who patented the Howe truss, permitted tightening of the tension rods to induce compression in the wood diagonals.
It's a 238-foot-long timber structure with 10 gothic-style louvered windows on each side and a 165-foot housed Howe truss, which is the wood framework that supports the bridge.
They chose a from known as a Howe truss; in a larger form, it was the most widely used type of truss for covered wooden bridges in the late 1800s and early 1900s.
Owner-built Howe trusses: tie rods and standard lumber
All of Lane County's covered bridges feature the Howe truss form of construction, vertical-batten siding and roofline windows.
Constructed in 1938, this bridge utilizes a Howe truss design that spans 75 feet over the Mohawk River.
Authentic wooden Howe trusses support the roof, sidewalls, and a sidewalk.