hubris

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hubris

, hybris
(in Greek tragedy) an excess of ambition, pride, etc., ultimately causing the transgressor's ruin
References in periodicals archive ?
A parallel relationship between the two men is even more strongly suggested as each man hubristically puts his treasured possession at risk, the driver by not backing up and taking an alternate route and Sal by stubbornly refusing to relocate, a decision repeatedly questioned throughout the film.
'In short, I aim', she announces (somewhat hubristically), 'to historicize God' (199).
Medical providers should "hold firm (but not hubristically or dogmatically so) to their conceptions of their patients' good, while recognizing that in many cases their confidence in what is best is not rooted in their medical expertise."
As such, it is a way of asserting power and privilege, of hubristically holding oneself up as a moral exemplar.
This concerns not merely a "traffic was bad, and we had to skip dessert to rush here only to fight for parking" set of peripheral circumstances; much more to the point, it concerns a company which, before the stage action even began, had hubristically announced a credo to which they did not adhere in practice, sneered at academia, and proudly disdained four hundred years of theatrical practice and theory.
In his almost 2,500-word-long diatribe against the poet, Canning describes Ginsberg as "depressingly base," "whining, wheedling, on the make; defensive, accusatory, and sly," a writer who "will exhaust and enervate" the reader, someone whose every letter has "an overblown quality," a writer who is given to "name-calling" and is "weirdly pedantic." He portrays the poet as a calculating man interested in "mutual exploitation," whose "grubbing for favor is unappetizing," someone who liked to "blow his own hom," who wrote "hubristically," and whose "accounts of his travels are perfunctory, even cliched," resembling a "National Lampoon's Vacation, or the rampant text-messaging of an adolescent." Canning ends his article by denouncing Ginsberg as "conceited" and "bombastic."
Examples abound of aggressive acquisitions, built on hubristically estimated synergies, that fail to create the value that was promised.
When the first mate, Starbuck, characterizes Ahab's intended vengeance against a dumb brute (for "demasting" him of his leg) as blasphemous, Ahab damns the whale for his "inscrutable malice" and rants hubristically to Starbuck: "Talk not to me of blasphemy, man; I'd strike the sun if it insulted me." Elsewhere Melville explicitly links Ahab to Prometheus, one of the most notable rebels in mythology.
After a decade of debt during which the Government hubristically claimed it had abolished boom and bust our economy is in turmoil.
It's billed, hubristically, as "A Stampede of Wildly Passionate Music and Dance." But this stampede has the excitement of stamp-collecting.
To allow myself to be constituted by such conventions about language (or any other social practice and behavior, even if ideal and situated in some past community of forms) is either foolishly weak or hubristically ambitious: one either accepts that one's life is lived as a form of rumor or one hopes to re-establish by one's own good grammar a community of forms of extravagant and fastidious self-consciousness.
Today, we have a similar plethora of individuals and organisations arguing about what is good for children, some informed and sensitive, others hubristically pursuing the bee in their bonnet.