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Hull,

former city, Que., Canada: see GatineauGatineau
, city (2016 pop. 276,245), SW Que, Canada, at the junction of the Gatineau and Ottawa rivers and across the Ottawa from Ottawa, Ont. The fourth largest city in Quebec, it was created through the merger of 5 municipalities in 2002, including Gatineau, the most populous
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.

Hull,

officially

Kingston upon Hull,

city and unitary authority (2011 pop. 256,406), NE England, on the north shore of the Humber estuary at the influx of the small Hull River. Its port is one of the chief outlets for the surrounding area, which is also accessible by rail. Imports include oilseed, wood, foodstuffs, wool, metal ores, and petroleum; exports include coal, coke, machinery, automobiles, tractors, iron and steel products, and textiles. Hull is also one of the world's largest fishing ports. Among its many manufactures are processed foods, chemicals, iron and steel products, and machinery. Flour mills and sawmills are nearby.

Hull was founded late in the 13th cent. by Edward I, and the construction of docks, which extend for miles along the Humber, was begun c.1775. In July, 1981, the Humber BridgeHumber Bridge,
vehicular suspension bridge across the Humber estuary, E England. Completed in 1981, it links Kingston upon Hull (see Hull) with the estuary's southern shore.
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 was opened; communication with other cities thus improved, and Hull's economic value increased. The Wilberforce House, Municipal Museum, and Ferens Art Galleries are noteworthy. The grammar school, founded in 1486, was attended by Andrew MarvellMarvell, Andrew
, 1621–78, one of the English metaphysical poets. Educated at Cambridge, he worked as a clerk, traveled abroad, and returned to serve as tutor to Lord Fairfax's daughter in Yorkshire.
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 and William WilberforceWilberforce, William,
1759–1833, British politician and humanitarian. He was elected to Parliament in 1780 and during the campaign formed a lifelong friendship with William Pitt, whose measures he generally supported in the House of Commons.
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, who were born in Hull. Schools include the Univ. of Hull, Endsleigh College, and Kingston upon Hull College. Trinity House, established in 1369 to aid sailors, has been Trinity House Navigation School since 1787. Hull's annual fair is one of the largest in England.

Hull

 

the principal part of a ship, consisting of the shell and the frame (framing).

The hull provides buoyancy and general and local strength to the ship and makes it possible to arrange a place for people, cargo, equipment, weaponry, and other things according to the functions of the ship. The outer shell of the hull (bottom and side plating and deck surface) makes it watertight; it may be multitiered. The inside shells, which divide the hull into compartments, are called second bottom, second or inside walls, lower decks, platforms, and bulkheads. The frame and plating are essential elements of any ship hull; the use of decks and bulk-heads depends on the function of the ship. A distinction is made between the main hull and above-deck structures arranged on the continuous top deck (ship superstructures, rooms, masts, and the like).

In modern shipbuilding steel, aluminum and titanium alloys, plastics, wood, and reinforced concrete are used for building the hulls of ships. What is called hull steel in the form of sheets, strips, rolled sections (bulb bar, T -section, angle and shaped) with maximum yield between 220 and 700 meganewtons per sq m (from 22 to 70 kilograms = force per sq mm) has become most common for building the hulls of ships of different sizes and designations. The individual steel parts of the hull are connected by welding and in some cases by riveting. Aluminum alloys, wood, and plastics are used basically for building the hulls of small ships and for above-deck structures. Titanium alloys are used primarily for building the strong hulls of submarines, and reinforced concrete is used for the hulls of barges, docks, and landing stages.

REFERENCE

Barabanov, N. V. Konstruktsiia korpusa morskikh sudov. Leningrad, 1969.

A. I. MAKSIMADZHI

hull

[həl]
(botany)
The outer, usually hard, covering of a fruit or seed.
(food engineering)
To remove husks from fruits and seeds, as from ears of corn, nuts, or peas.
To remove the shell of a crustacean or mollusk, as an oyster.
(mathematics)
(naval architecture)
The body or shell of a ship.
(ordnance)
The outer casing of a rocket, guided missile, or the like.
Massive armored body of a tank, exclusive of tracks, motor, turret, and armament.

hull

An obsolete term for the framework of a building.

hull

1. the main body of a vessel, tank, flying boat, etc.
2. the shell or pod of peas or beans; the outer covering of any fruit or seed; husk
3. the persistent calyx at the base of a strawberry, raspberry, or similar fruit

Hull

1
Cordell. 1871--1955, US statesman; secretary of state (1933-- 44). He helped to found the U.N.: Nobel peace prize 1945

Hull

2
1. a city and port in NE England, in Kingston upon Hull unitary authority, East Riding of Yorkshire: fishing, food processing; two universities. Pop.: 301 416 (2001). Official name: Kingston upon Hull
2. a city in SE Canada, in SW Quebec on the River Ottawa: a centre of the timber trade and associated industries. Pop.: 66 246 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
Birdsell is credited with production of the first combined clover huller in 1855.
Huller says her next free report will offer job seekers tips on shattering the glass ceiling.
Tres anos despues, en mayo de 1887, se formalizo otro acuerdo entre Huller, como representante de la compania, y el gobierno mexicano para una concesion ferroviaria: el derecho de construir el ferrocarril de Baja California y de operarlo durante un periodo de 99 anos.
Huller gives a startling performance as the young woman whose mood-swings and religious fervour are balanced by her desire for a kind of freedom.
Ted Huller joins Osborn & Burr Communications as vice president, integrated media director.
We are looking for a grain huller and a sorghum press.
PT Bogasari Flour Mills, the largest producer of wheat flour would not be encouraged to increase imports in short term because of the regulation, as if they increase imports of hulled grain their huller machines will be lying idle.
Following die-casting, each component goes through a press trim process before being machined, to include the creation of datum holes, on a Cross Huller twin table rotary transfer machine," comments Mark Palethorpe, manufacturing engineer at the Worcester plant.
A mistake at the huller for an hour could cost three weeks to correct," says Lee.
Textile factories turned lint into cloth, but until around 1830 when a huller that removed the hulls from the kernel was developed, the lint-fuzzed seeds had little value except for replanting.
There is also a broad range of gadgets for would-be gourmets from basic spatulas and several varieties of whisk to more unusual and esoteric tools such as a strawberry huller or a celery brush.
Scharoun continued his collaboration with Huller over the staging arrangements, which became extremely radical: the first truly 'aperspective' theatre.