humour


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humour

(US), humor
1. any of various fluids in the body, esp the aqueous humour and vitreous humour
2. Archaic any of the four bodily fluids (blood, phlegm, choler or yellow bile, melancholy or black bile) formerly thought to determine emotional and physical disposition

humour

amusement, laughter, and the like created by the paradoxical, ironic outcomes of social situations, language, and the portrayal of these in literature, art and the theatre. Although humour is a universal feature of human societies and a diverse literature exists (not least the work of Freud), the treatment of humour, has been only fragmentary within sociology, despite its importance in social life. See M. Mulkay, On Humour (1988).

humour

References in periodicals archive ?
He paid tributes to the role of Mushtaq Ahmed Yusufi in the field of humour writing and said that he had given new dimension to humour writing with his unique style.
Nicholas Holm, Humour as Politics: The Political Aesthetics of Contemporary Comedy, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, Springer, 2017, 223 pp., $80.00 (hardcover).
The findings, published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, contradict some of the research carried out to date in the psychology of humour.
Summary: Researchers in Austria recently discovered that funny people, particularly those who enjoy dark humour, have higher IQs than their less funny peers.
Is It Ok to Laugh About It?: Holocaust Humour, Satire and Parody in Israeli Culture
Little wonder, then, that for the most part the phenomenon of humour in the consulting room has been avoided entirely, approached cautiously, or indeed reproached contemptuously by psychotherapists over the years.
Summary: Often overlooked, humour can be a powerful tool to enhance productivity at the workplace.
Humour that will end in tears DUDLEY'S TGF Bros, Bus Pranksters, do what they do because to them it's funny.
Although the primary function of humour is to make people laugh, it also plays a major role in shaping people's attitudes.
It's actually one finding from a study by researcher Fabio Sala"a consultant with the Hay Group's McClelland Centre for Research and Innovation"who found a positive correlation between the size of executives' bonuses and their use of humour. The study also found that outstanding executives use humor more than twice as often as the socalled average executives do.