humus


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humus

(hyo͞o`məs), organic matter that has decayed to a relatively stable, amorphous state. It is an important biological constituent of fertile soilsoil,
surface layer of the earth, composed of fine rock material disintegrated by geological processes; and humus, the organic remains of decomposed vegetation. In agriculture, soil is the medium that supports crop plants, both physically and biologically.
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. Humus is formed by the decomposing action of soil microorganisms (e.g., bacteria and fungi), which break down animal and vegetable material into elements that can be used by growing plants. Technically, humus, as the end result of this process, is less valuable for plant growth than are the products formed during active decomposition (see fertilizerfertilizer,
organic or inorganic material containing one or more of the nutrients—mainly nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, and other essential elements required for plant growth.
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). Because of its low specific weight and high surface area, humus has a profound effect upon the physical properties of mineral soils with regard to improved soil structure, water intake and reservoir capacity, ability to resist erosion, and the ability to hold chemical elements in a form readily accessible to plants.

Humus

 

an organic, normally dark-colored part of the soil formed as a result of biochemical transformation of plant and animal residues. Humus consists of humic acids (most important for soil fertility) and fulvic acids (crenic acids). Humus contains the main elements of plant nutrition that become available to plants as a result of microbial activity.

humus

[′hyü·məs]
(geology)
The amorphous, ordinarily dark-colored, colloidal matter in soil; a complex of the fractions of organic matter of plant, animal, and microbial origin that are most resistant to decomposition.

humus

A brown or black material formed by the partial decomposition of vegetable or animal matter; the organic portion of soil.

humus

a dark brown or black colloidal mass of partially decomposed organic matter in the soil. It improves the fertility and water retention of the soil and is therefore important for plant growth
References in periodicals archive ?
for the evaluation of the agrochemical and humus status of humus cover) were gathered in the field from all dominant soil species using the transect method.
Humus is a quick and easy snack thats packed with protein and can balance blood sugar levels and fight food cravings, both of which could lead to less snacking in between meals.
The aim of the present study was to test whether humus, N and energy balances and GHG emissions differ between compost fertilisation and mineral N fertilisation, with the help of the model software REPRO.
--grey and light-brownish, sometimes dark fragments (humus tongues, roots, molhills); wetting, nutty, of high density, light-sticky, clayey, contains many wormholes and roots; living roots are few; the transition to the next horizon is gradual and level.
Humus accumulates great amount of nutrients which in the course of mineralization with the help of microorganisms pass into soil solution where they are absorbed by plant roots.
Therefore, the formation of humus soil horizon (H) in time (t) may be represented as follows:
Esta macromolecula alcanzo su mayor contenido (20.3 [+ o -] 2.28%) en Humus a 180 [micron]E/[m.sup.2] x s; mientras que el menor porcentaje (7.8 [+ o -] 1.62%) se observo en medio Algal a 60 [micron]E/[m.sup.2] x s.
Para o comprimento da parte aerea, em funcao das fontes organicas, verifica-se que os substratos fertilizados com esterco ovino e humus de minhoca apresentaram os maiores valores de crescimento, sao estatisticamente semelhantes entre si, mas superam o esterco bovino aos 120 e 150 DAS.
The interrelationships of ecosystems' bio and geo components are reflected regularly in the topsoil (epipedon) fabric, which is determined by humus cover type (or humus forms).