Farmer

(redirected from husbandman)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to husbandman: yeoman, vine

Farmer

John. ?1565--1605, English madrigal composer and organist
References in periodicals archive ?
Where sky meets earth lies the surface of the ground, a surface seasonally inscribed by the feet of the wayfarer or husbandman, or by the hooves of his flocks and herds, only to be wiped clean by wind, rain, and snowmelt before being inscribed once again, in the next season.
The Unfortunate Husbandman. An Account of the Life and Travels of a Real Farmer in Ireland, Scotland, England and America.
Flower, husbandman of Knightsbridge, being at Robinson's shop door, said there was a great stir in London with the apprentices for the good of the Commonwealth; that 1,800 of them had pulled down the pillories in Cheapside and Leadenhall, and set up a gallows against the door of the Lord Mayor, whom they would hang if he dared come out, but he dared not; and that 3,000 were lying in the fields, with bills and clubs, to rescue the apprentices, if anything were done to them.
send for a poor and silly husbandman, ask him what hope he hath of his harvest to come.
This accusation is revealing, because civilization ultimately depends on fences and on "playing farmer." In Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, historian Edward Gibbon contrasted the lifestyles of the "shepherd" and the "husbandman," arguing that while the farmer's "patient toil" is the basis of stable society, the "vagrant tribes of hunters and shepherds, whose indolence refuses to cultivate the earth, and whose restless spirit disdains...
Noah became a husbandman, planted a vineyard and drank from that wine.
Primrose, a man who, as Goldsmith writes in the Advertisement, "unites in himself the three greatest characters upon earth; he is a priest, an husbandman, and the father of a family" (3).
Glosses are provided for many words that either appear in modern dictionaries or, if used by Browne in ways that differ slightly from modern usage, seem clear enough in their context: in Religio Medici alone, glosses are provided for importunity, singularity, clime, prelates, usurpation, scrupulous, take up the gauntlet, extirpate, inveigle (spelled differently in text and in key word in gloss), solecism, equivocal (twice), cosmography, prodigies, hieroglyphics, Pentateuch, legerdemain, changelings, progenies, antipathies (twice), construe, memento mori, livery, flaming mountains ("volcanoes"), inundation, reprehension, impostures, peccadillo, quotidian, prating, husbandman, deleterious.
Genesis 9:20-25 reads: "And Noach the husbandman began, and planted a vineyard.
Whether as husbandman or as warrior, he strives to embody kalos kagathos not as Xenophon's beloved head of an economic community (like Ischomachus or Cyrus), but as "himself alone" (1.5.23).
After the covenant of the rainbow and the list of Noah's sons, the Bible relates: Noah the husbandman began, and planted a vineyard.
(43) Like the 'husbandman, the labourer, the miner or the smith', the journalist, periodical writer, abridger or epitome writer makes a necessary and valuable contribution to the cultural economy, one that is worthy of recognition, but which is thereby naturalized as different in value and status from the works of the masters of learning.