hybrid identity

hybrid identity

(U. Beck, 2000) a pattern of individual identity in post-traditional contemporary society in which individuals may move freely between multiple identities in a way partly of their own choosing, but which may sometimes lead to conflict and confusion. Beck also suggests that clearly defined roles may be in decline, social solidarity in retreat, social existence becoming ‘conflictual coexistence’, and that many of the previous traditional and industrial forms of society which nominally survive may in fact have become ‘zombie categories’, no longer reflecting actual patterns of existence. Thus, individuality in modern society ‘can also be understood as radical non-identity’.
References in periodicals archive ?
She argues that the construction of a unified Sephardi identity was a choice and part and parcel of creating a hybrid identity as both Jewish and Argentine.
She believes that her marriage to a western man leads to a new, hybrid identity, compensates for her inferiority, and helps the process of Americanization.
A hybrid identity was due to Black immigrants' complex navigation of both familial and American/peer cultural norms, thus reflecting an on-going identity process (Allen et al.
This writer begins to explore his hybrid identity in the 1948 novel The Ship and the Flame and in the 1965 Night Search.
Contrary to her husband's essentialist ideas, Alsana embraces a more hybrid identity although she also has prejudices against different ethnicities.
The theme of hybrid identity recurs in the chapter on Leslie Howard, the British born actor, filmmaker, and broadcaster whose Hungarian Jewish descent, Lassner argues, made him especially sensitive to the Nazi persecution of Jews in World War II.
The irony is that those engaged in hybrid assimilation may in fact not claim a hybrid identity at all.
Bhabha further argues that cultures that conflict with a dominant culture evolve towards a hybrid identity whether they have been post-colonial, migrant or diasporic.
This paper aims to investigate the problematic hybrid identity of Gogol, a representative of the second generation of immigrants, in The Namesake.
CineAction developed its own unique, hybrid identity and found a specialized international readership.
It is a superficial argument, repeated a few weeks ago by Eleni Theocharous, who claimed that mixed schools and changes to history books would "destroy our Greek conscience" and pave the way for the "creation of a hybrid identity.
Yet this slight change in musical trajectory has left them with a bit of a hybrid identity.