hybrid swarm


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hybrid swarm

[′hī·brəd ′swȯrm]
(genetics)
A collection of hybrids produced when there is a breakdown of isolating barriers between two species whose areas of distribution overlap.
References in periodicals archive ?
In regard to the evolutionary development of modern cichlids from Lake Tanganyika and in accordance with the hybrid swarm theory, the research team discovered that a cichlid species from the Lower Congo River reached the lake and interbreed with their lake ancestors, thereby facilitating the adaptive radiation of the cichlids in Lake Tanganyika.
Five of these loci (mtDNA, Ctg325, Gnat1, FoxG1b, HoxD8, and WNT1) were among the first to be developed for investigations of genetic admixture in the main body of the hybrid swarm in the Salinas Valley and had been successfully used repeatedly in previous studies (e.g., Fitzpatrick and Shaffer, 2007).
The bald is home to a hybrid swarm of multicolored azaleas, with flowers ranging in color from red, orange, pink, yellow, to white, and many of these flower colors and forms are not found on other balds.
Genetic analysis of an interspecific hybrid swarm of Populus: occurrence of unidirectional introgression.
Nonetheless, in the absence of any selection against hybrids, continued hybridization over a number of generations should eventually spawn a hybrid swarm in the overlap zone.
Washington, May 23 (ANI): Certain species of stickleback fish have collapsed into hybrid swarms as water clarity in their native lakes has changed, and certain species of tree frogs have collapsed as vegetation has been removed around their shared breeding ponds.
However, these habitats often are found in close proximity throughout the central and western United States, resulting in the production of innumerable hybrid swarms or mosaic hybrid zones.
(2004) suggest that if successful reproduction of female hybrids is common, then hybrid swarms could decrease the extent of pure lynx at the southern periphery of the species range.
The "hybrid bridge" hypothesis: host shifting via plant hybrid swarms. American Naturalist 141:651-662.