hydathode


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hydathode

[′hīd·ə‚thōd]
(botany)
An opening of the epidermis of higher plants specialized for exudation of water.
References in periodicals archive ?
culminating into exudation from hydathodes in liquid form as guttation.
However, the presence of hydathode trichomes may also reflect the plant habitat, as it is not surprising to find hydathodes in aquatic or wetland plants (Metcalfe and Chalk, 1979).
protected microsites (e.g., trichome bases, stomates, hydathodes) will
At present, many studies have identified that water can diffuse into leaves through the cuticle [9, 12, 14], hydathodes [3], and absorbent trichomes [21].
Venation free, veins visible, regularly bifurcate at similar distances from the costa, ending in large hydathodes. Superficial indument of scales and hairs, the scales on rachises, costae, and veins, absent in laminae.
The structure and development of the hydathodes of Spartina townsendii Groves.
1 mm apart, diverging at 75-85[grados] from costa; hydathodes absent; fertile fronds 22-33 cm long; stipes 1/5-2/5 of frond length; fertile blades 15-27 x 1.9-3.7 cm, narrowly elliptic, basally attenuate to acute, apically acute; intersporangial scales absent.
80[grados] from costa; hydathodes lacking; blade scales 1-2 x 0.2-0.5 mm, subulate, dark brown to black, marginally entire, present only on the margin; fertile fronds 25-40 cm long; stipes 2/3-3/4 the frond length; fertile blades 12-18 x 2.2-3.0 cm, lanceolate, basically obtuse to rounded, apically acute; intersporangial scales absent.
Equisetum species, like many other plants, have hydathodes (Johnson, 1936).
50-60[degrees] angle from costa; hydathodes present; fertile fronds 8-14 cm; stipes 2/3-4/5 of the frond length; fertile blades 2-4 x 0.8-1.1 cm, lanceolate narrowly elliptic, basically cuneate, apically acute to acuminate; intersporangial scales 3-5 x 0.2-0.4 mm, subulate, dark reddish brown to atropurpureous, patent, lustrous, dispersed, entire margin.
excised leaves showed brown coloration in the hydathodes at 226
Such structures are regarded as functional analogues to hydathodes, which typically occur in angiosperms (Ziegenspeck, 1948) and may maintain a sufficient water flow (and nutrient supply) by guttating water, which, in turn, facilitates a constant xylem stream when transpiration is reduced (Ziegler, 1982).