hydrate

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hydrate

(hī`drāt), chemical compound that contains water. A common hydrate is the familiar blue vitriol, a crystalline form of cupric sulfatecupric sulfate
or copper (II) sulfate,
chemical compound, CuSO4, taking the form of white rhombohedral crystals or amorphous powder. It decomposes at 650°C; to cupric oxide (CuO).
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. Chemically, it is cupric sulfate pentahydrate, CuSO4·5H2O. When a crystal of the substance is formed, five molecules of water (H2O) are combined in the crystal with each molecule of cupric sulfate (CuSO4). This water is called water of crystallization. When cupric sulfate pentahydrate is heated above 150°C; the water of crystallization is driven off and anhydrous cupric sulfate is formed. It has several properties different from the pentahydrate, e.g., color, density, and crystal structure. Glauber's saltGlauber's salt,
common name for sodium sulfate decahydrate, Na2SO4·10H2O; it occurs as white or colorless monoclinic crystals. Upon exposure to fairly dry air it effloresces, forming powdery anhydrous sodium sulfate.
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 is sodium sulfate decahydrate, Na2SO4·10H2O. Crystals of it readily give up their water of crystallization at ordinary temperatures, forming a powdery coating of the anhydrous salt; this phenomenon (efflorescence) is exhibited by many hydrates. The number of molecules of water present in a given hydrate is fixed. However, some substances form several different hydrates. There are four different hydrates of ferrous sulfate, each with its own unique physical properties. In organic chemistry a compound formed by addition of water to a carbon-carbon double bond is sometimes called a hydrate; it contains a hydroxyl functional group and usually cannot be dehydrated. In commerce a metal hydroxide is sometimes called a hydrate; e.g., calcium hydrate is calcium hydroxide.

hydrate

[′hī‚drāt]
(chemistry)
A form of a solid compound which has water in the form of H2 O molecules associated with it; for example, anhydrous copper sulfate is a white solid with the formula CuSO4, but when crystallized from water a blue crystalline solid with formula CuSO4·5H2 O results, and the water molecules are an integral part of the crystal.
A crystalline compound resulting from the combination of water and a gas; frequently a constituent of natural gas that is under pressure.

hydrate

1. To combine with water or elements of water.
2. Hydrated lime.

hydrate

1. a chemical compound containing water that is chemically combined with a substance and can usually be expelled without changing the constitution of the substance
2. a chemical compound that can dissociate reversibly into water and another compound. For example sulphuric acid (H2SO4) dissociates into sulphur trioxide (SO3) and water (H2O)
3. a chemical compound, such as a carbohydrate, that contains hydrogen and oxygen atoms in the ratio two to one
References in periodicals archive ?
So when I heard about the beverage hydration index, I wanted to know if other drinks could hydrate you as efficiently as I believe.
Of great interest, these two sets of properties decide whether gas hydrates exist, where they could exist, and the consequent ability to use them in some way or another.
Natural gas hydrates typically form two crystalline structures: Structure I and Structure II (also known as Type I and Type II).
Only with sophisticated models like this, he says, can we accurately see the possibilities of offshore permafrost melt--including methane hydrates.
The aim of this work is the investigation of the mechanical conversions of natural gas aquatic clathrates, as well as the scale and ways of the chemical conversions of the hydrocarbons in the process of the mechanical activation of gas hydrates.
But gas hydrates present both scientific and technological challenges as they are yet to be tapped.
They formed the hydrates from water and carbon dioxide with the gases cyclopentane and cyclohexane, which made the method work more efficiently.
Gas hydrates are crystalline water-based solids, consisting of large amounts of methane and physically resembling ice.
There is potential for climate change to alter sea temperatures and cause more nethane to be released from seabed hydrates.
For most other countries and companies, developing hydrates comes at the bottom of the list of commercial priorities behind easier and proven forms of fossil energy including conventional and unconventional oil and gas, coal-bed methane, gas-to-liquids and coal-to-liquids technology.
The compact structure of a basic hydrate unit, how to look for hydrates at sea, role of the Hydrate Stability Zone, environmental impact of gas hydrates, and hazards associated with hydrates are all explored within this report.
Clathrate hydrates (or gas hydrates) are crystalline water-based solids physically resembling ice, in which small non-polar molecules (typically gases) or polar molecules with large hydrophobic moieties are trapped inside 'cages' of hydrogen bonded water molecules.