hydraulic gradient

hydraulic gradient

[hī′drȯ·lik ′grād·ē·ənt]
(fluid mechanics)
With regard to an aquifer, the rate of change of pressure head per unit of distance of flow at a given point and in a given direction.
(hydrology)
The slope of the hydraulic grade line of a stream.

hydraulic gradient

1. The loss of head per unit distance of flow.
2. In a drainage system, the slope of a drainage line between the trap outlet and vent connection.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim is to simulate the test depicted in Figure 4, wherein a vertical upward flow is experienced by the soil due to an imposed hydraulic gradient. Small sized finite
Replacement of the amortisated ether pipes with polyethylene PE 100, SDR17, PN 10 with a safety coefficient C = 1.25, a hydraulic gradient K = 0.01 mm is envisaged.
where Z is the groundwater discharge, i is the natural hydraulic gradient and T is the aquifer transmissivity, multiplication of the depth of the aquifer with hydraulic conductivity K, which is a measure of the rate at which water moves through a unit width of the aquifer under a unit hydraulic gradient.
Using argon or nitrogen leads to degassing in the experimental core that is subjected to a substantial hydraulic gradient.
The hydraulic gradient, volumetric flow rate, and uranyl ions concentration were monitored over time.
In relation to prior studies using column percolation tests, Yong (2001) adopted a hydraulic gradient of the order of 55, Morandini and Leite (2015) adopted a hydraulic gradient of the order of 50, based on recommendations of the standard ASTM D 4874 (American Society for Testing and Materials [ASTM], 1995) it could be used a hydraulic gradient of 24, and Rojas, Consoli, and Heineck (2007) worked with a maximum hydraulic gradient of approximately 92.
Pressure drop at the rated flow rate can vary, depending on where the cooling coil is located in the system hydraulic gradient curve.
In order to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of pumping, vacuum drainage puts negative air pressure in the dewatering wells or drainage pipes to improve the hydraulic gradient of groundwater.
In previous studies, paste-like tailings slurry (PLTS) was simplified as a Bingham plastic fluid, whose flow properties were time-independent, and the existing empirical formulas for calculating the hydraulic gradient of a paste-like flow were derived based on the time-invariant Bingham model [7].
WhereQ is the water discharge, K is the hydraulic conductivity of the soil (soil permeability), A isthe cross sectional flow area and i is the hydraulic gradient which is given by the following equation:
It was determined that in the course filtration at higher hydraulic gradients, clay mineral particles re-orientate parallel to the water flow lines, and, with the hydraulic gradient dropping down, clay particles do not return to the initial position.
v--velocity of flow in the sample [m/s], i--hydraulic gradient [m/m] where hydraulic gradient is: