hydride


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

hydride

any compound of hydrogen with another element, including ionic compounds such as sodium hydride (NaH), covalent compounds such as borane (B2H6), and the transition metal hydrides formed when certain metals, such as palladium, absorb hydrogen
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hydride

[′hī‚drīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
A compound containing hydrogen and another element; examples are H2S, which is a hydride although it may be properly called hydrogen sulfide, and lithium hydride, LiH.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The hydrides being developed by the team are protected from oxygen in the air by a porous polymer coating, meaning the fuel is safe to use.
Metal hydrides are formed by combining metal alloys and hydrogen.
Figure 1(c) confirms the pure phase of Mg-Fe hydride (PDF-38-0843) where Figure 1(d) represents again the pure elemental phase of Mg and Fe nanoparticles after dehydrogenation.
Although nickel metal hydride batteries have been widely used as a power source for the portable device, it has been replaced by high performance lithium batteries and the amount of production of small, Ni-MH for the portable device has sharply decreased.
Panasonic's Nickel Metal Hydride batteries offer up to three times the capacity of same size standard Nickel Cadmium batteries.
* The Nickel Metal Hydride batteries offer up 3 times the capacity of same size standard Nickel Cadmium batteries.
The calculated enthalpy and entropy of formation of magnesium hydride Mg[H.sub.2] are given in Table 2 together with experimental data from the literature.
Therefore, hydrogen binds with weak interaction (lower bonding strength) with the Mg or [Mg.sub.2]Ni and forms reversible hydride of [Mg.sub.2]Ni[H.sub.4] and Mg[H.sub.2].
As a result, the hydrogen hydride cation should have a strong tendency to donate a proton, without the concerted transfer of an electron.
In early March of this year, Honda began supplying a battery manufacturer with rare earth metals extracted from used nickel-metal hydride batteries at a JMC plant for reuse in new nickel-metal hydride batteries of hybrid vehicles.
Honda has been recovering the rare earth metals since April at a plant in Oguni, Yamagata Prefecture, operated by Tokyo-based Japan Metals & Chemicals Co., with which the automaker has developed technology to extract over 80 percent of the metals used in nickel hydride batteries.