Hydrocele

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Related to hydroceles: hydrocoele, Varicoceles

hydrocele

[′hī·drə‚sēl]
(medicine)
Accumulation of fluid in the membranes surrounding the testis.

Hydrocele

 

testicular edema; an accumulation of serous fluid in the tunica vaginalis testis that occurs as the result of difficulty in discharging the fluids through the lymphatic vessels.

Hydrocele may be congenital or it may appear with inflammatory diseases of the testis (orchitis), its adnexa (epi-didymitis), or the spermatic cord, or with injuries or neoplasms. The development of hydrocele is also fostered by inguinal hernias and dilation of the veins of the spermatic cord. Treatment for acute hydrocele not accompanied by severe pain and rise in body temperature consists of the elimination of the primary disease; surgical intervention is indicated in cases of chronic hydrocele.

References in periodicals archive ?
The treatment of hydrocele of canal of Nuck is complete surgical excision of the hydrocele.
Hydrocele of canal of Nuck, the female counterpart of hydrocele of the spermatic cord, is a rare cause of inguinal swelling in women.
Advise and provide reassurance regarding less serious surgical causes such as hydrocele and umbilical hernia
ix) Hydrocele in boys: which of the following are true?
The hydrocele may contain multiple heterogeneous extratesticular nodular masses, ranging in size from a few millimetres to several centimetres, attached to the tunica vaginalis; or a single heterogeneous extratesticular mass arising from the scrotal wall.
Almost 25 million men suffer from genital manifestations of the disease (mostly hydrocele, chylocele and swellings of the scrotum and penis), another 15 million mainly women have lymphoedema or elephantiasis of the leg as well as acute and recurrent secondary bacterial infections.
Primary or secondary treatments complicated by a hydrocele could then proceed to hydrocele repair.
Reactive hydroceles can also be present, but the testes and epididymides often appear normal due to separate blood supplies.
When a peritesticular mass with calcifications and hydroceles is found on prenatal sonography, it is important to consider MPO and search for signs of meconium peritonitis.
Often there is a reactive hydrocele and scrotal wall thickening.