dressing

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dressing

1. a covering for a wound, sore, etc.
2. size used for stiffening textiles

Dressing

Masonry and moldings of better quality than the facing materials, used around openings or at corners of buildings.

Dressing

 

a therapeutic and diagnostic procedure in the treatment of wounds that consists of removing old, contaminated dressings, examining and treating the wound and surrounding skin, and applying medication and a fresh bandage.

Aseptic and antiseptic methods must be strictly followed during the dressing procedure. The frequency of dressing and the type of medications used depend on the condition of the wound, which is dressed until completely healed.

dressing

[′dres·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Manure or compost used as a fertilizer.
(civil engineering)
The process of smoothing or squaring lumber or stone for use in a building.
(engineering)
The sharpening, repairing, and replacing of parts, notably drilling bits and tool joints, to ready equipment for reuse.
(medicine)
Application of various materials for protecting a wound and encouraging healing.
Material so applied.

dressing, dressings

1. Projecting ornamental moldings and carved decorations of all kinds.
2. Masonry or molding of better quality than the facing brick; used around openings or at corners of buildings; often made of gauged brick.
3. Smoothing a stone surface.
4. Bossing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Types of hydrocolloid dressing applied n % Cumulative percent Aquacel Ag 14 42.
Chi square test was used to compare the wound infection following use of gauze dressing (group A) and hydrocolloid dressing (group B).
A multicenter trial conducted on 95 patients with 102 sutured wounds showed that a hydrocolloid dressing required less dressing change and was more comfortable for the patient than a gauze and tape dressing (Hermans 1993).
On the other hand, if hydrocolloid dressings are ordered for the same 10 wounds, only 20 to 30 dressing changes a week will be needed.
For example, in a controlled study of 124 shave biopsies, 31% of wounds treated with the hydrocolloid dressing Duoderm were healed after seven days, compared with only 12% of those treated with a topical antibiotic ointment and conventional dressing.
We tend to use hydrocolloid dressings a great deal, usually giving a particular treatment 14 days in which to work.
The topical wound dressings are hydrocolloid dressings, hydrogel dressings, polyurethane dressings, transparent film dressings, absorptive dressings, gauze, and biological/synthetic dressings (see Table 2).