hydrogen damage


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hydrogen damage

[′hī·drə·jən ‚dam·ij]
(metallurgy)
Corrosion, common in boilers, caused by diffusion of hydrogen through steel reacting with carbon to form methane, which builds up local stresses at the interfaces between grains, forming voids that ultimately produce failure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rajicic, "Hydrogen damage of steels: a case study and hydrogen embrittlement model," Engineering Failure Analysis, vol.
On-line monitoring of hydrogen permeation current can provide a causal link between the approximate magnitude of general corrosion, from which the performance of inhibition treatments can be assessed, and an early warning of hydrogen damage for setting suitable inspection intervals.
In this study, the diffused hydrogen atoms tend to accumulate around the high-stress field, interfaces, and grain boundaries, leading to the main hydrogen damage that can be obtained by means of stress-induced diffusion, which is given by Dean [35]:
Hydrogen damage is evident as internal voids and surface bubbles.
Accelerations in FCGR due to hydrogen damage may be inhibited by adding small concentrations of certain gases to hydrogen.
In the case of steel, hydrogen damage may reveal itself as delayed hydrogen cracking, degradation of mechanical properties, especially ductility, and can change microstructures and create bubbles filled with molecular hydrogen, methane or hydrogen sulfide.
"Advanced NDE & Non-Intrusive Inspection Techniques" is said to give a state-of-the-art summary of today's methods including inspecting production welding, corrosion mapping and monitoring, hydrogen damage and attack, inter granular stress corrosion cracking, in-service inspection of welds, flaw sizing and monitoring, weld root erosion, high temperature inspection and continuous monitoring techniques.
Hydrogen damage must also be considered and closed shrinkage porosity provides a significant hydrogen trap that inhibits hydrogen removal using thermal bake out procedures.