hydrogenase


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Related to hydrogenase: nitrogenase

hydrogenase

[hī′dräj·ə‚nās]
(biochemistry)
Enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hydrogen.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
protothecoides significantly increased because the anaerobic condition and hydrogenase activity induction became much easily.
This model is the first to successfully use hydrogenase and photosystem II to create semi-artificial photosynthesis driven purely by solar power.
TMA: trimethylamine; DMA: dimethylamine; MMA: monomethylamine; MeOH: methanol; MFR: methanofuran; [H.sub.4]MPT: tetrahydromethanopterin; HS-CoM coenzyme M; HS-CoB: coenzyme B; CoM-S-S-CoB: heterodisulfide of HS-CoM and HS-CoB; [F.sub.420][H.sub.2]: reduced coenzyme [F.sub.420]; [Fd.sub.red]: reduced ferredoxin; [Fd.sub.ox]: oxidized ferredoxin; [H.sub.2]ase: hydrogenase. The proteins detected in the study were highlighted in red and referred to in Table S2.
Shermana, "The uptake hydrogenase in the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp.
Part two discusses metalloproteins in in vivo and ex vivo energy production, including native hydrogenase, bio-inspired hydrogen production, and artificial metalloenzymes.
Dacarbazin induces geno toxic and cytotoxic germ cell damage with on comitant decrease in testosterone and increase in lactate hydrogenase concentration in the testis.
The second chapter reviews the electrochemistry of hydrogenase enzymes.
It was shown that two different hydrogenase enzymes were involved.
Stephen, "Purification of Hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1," Plant Physiology, vol.
Lee, "Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on photo-fermentative [H.sub.2] production associated with nitrogenase, uptake hydrogenase activity, and PHB accumulation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131," Bioresource Technology, vol.
(7.) Organisms that have the hydrogenase uptake enzyme (HUP+), such as soil and legume root bacteria, can capture and oxidize [H.sub.2] into 2H+ + 2e- and directly harvest that energy.

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