hydromorphic


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hydromorphic

[¦hī·drə′mȯr·fik]
(geology)
Referring to an intrazonal soil with characteristics that were developed in the presence of excess water all or part of the time.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study aimed to understand the effect of long-term fertilisation of nitrogen (N)-phosphorus (P)-potassium (K) additions alone and in combination with organic manure in relation to a control in a 30-year-old hydromorphic paddy soil of China.
Yellow Acrisol, Fluvic Neosol, and Indiscriminate Hydromorphic Soils are also present (Valente et al.
The soil in the experimental field is dark-yellow hydromorphic paddy soil.
Intra-zonal soils occupy a significant portion of the vineyard soil (>30%), the former being represented by regosols and erodisols on the more eroded slopes, and azonal, alluvial and/or hydromorphic soils on the valley meadows.
According to the French classification of soils (CPCS, 1967) the soils found in the study area are included into six classes: isohumic soils, vertisols, calcimagnesic soils, slightly developed soils, iron sesquioxides soils and hydromorphic soils (Badraoui & al., 1993).
Mudrocks record suspension deposition on the floodplain; blocky textures and roots within these beds record the development of immature hydromorphic paleosols and colonization by vegetation.
The development of the crusts and globule irons could have resulted from a hydromorphic process because of seasonal variations of the phreatic water (Astibia et al., 1999c; Elorza et al., 1999).
Soils are of sedimentary origin, occurring in clayey and sandy phases alternately and discontinuously, with a dominance of hydromorphic soils (CORINGA et al., 2012).
Overwetting of upper layers of soils and severe thermal conditions are limiting factors for earthworms functioning in soils of hydromorphic type.