hymnody


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Related to hymnody: hymnary, hymns

hymnody

1. the composition or singing of hymns
2. hymns collectively
References in periodicals archive ?
Rempel, "Anabaptist Religious Literature and Hymnody," in A Companion to Anabaptism and Spiritualism, ed.
de Jong, 1986, "I Want to Be like Jesus: The Self-Defining Power of Evangelical Hymnody," Journal of the American Academy of Religion 54(3), pp.
So, when my friends Jerry and Yvonne asked me to help them track down some hymnody for the funeral of Jerry's father, who died last May at the age of 96,1 was happy to help.
His poetic gifts gave to the church universal a magnificent legacy of memorable and theologically explicit hymnody.
Like many of those involved in the "reform of the reform" movement, Tucker is critical of contemporary Catholic hymnody, which he feels is too tied to popular musical forms.
Some African Americans living in the northern urban areas of the east coast in particular centered their efforts in developing a hymnody that was built on the foundations of both the spiritual and the gospel songs in the tradition of "Dr.
From these, it is evident that the compiler was quite familiar with developments in British hymnody during the late-seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, but it is equally evident that he relied primarily on three writers: Isaac Watts, James Maxwell, and Joseph Stennett.
Bradley also gives the impression of having sleuthed out every allusion to Gilbert's poetry and prose that has spiced the worlds of advertising, theater, television, church hymnody, film, sport, and politics in recent decades.
Each forged powerful literary and communal responses to the rise of race, as this book demonstrates in chapter-length close readings of Occom's hymnody, Marrant's sermons, Hall's speeches, and Allen's and Jones's narrative of African American responses to the yellow fever epidemic of 1794.
Their leaders wanted to find a place for the poetic or the aesthetic judgment; their hymnody shared in the feelings and in the vocations of the romantic poets; they wished to find a place and value for historical tradition, against the irreverent or sacrilegious hands of critical revolutionaries for whom no antiquity was sacred.
Lott, professor and chair of Music History at the School of Church Music at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, plans to conduct research for a critical edition of nineteenth-century American hymnody for the series Music in the United States of America (MUSA), administered by the American Musicological Society and published by A-R Editions, Inc.
Mark Noll, formerly McManis Chair of Christian Thought at Wheaton College, now at Notre Dame University, points out in his introductory remarks that much serious writing about hymnody has been "internal," that is, "devoted to the texts, tunes, and authors themselves rather than to the capacity of hymnic sources to shed light on the contexts of church, society, belief, community, and religious aspiration for which hymns have always been important" (ix).