hyoid

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hyoid

[′hī‚ȯid]
(anatomy)
A bone or complex of bones at the base of the tongue supporting the tongue and its muscles.
Of or pertaining to structures derived from the hyoid arch.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of this study is to determine the morphological features of the hyoid bone in Anatolian population and contribute additional data to the literature.
First, infrahyoid muscles and thyrohyoid membrane were cut following from the down to 1 cm of hyoid bone, then muscular and ligamentous structures of bone were removed.
The morphologic types of hyoid bone were detennined.
Averages of osteometric measurements of hyoid bone are shown in Table I.
Without considering the sex, whereas the differences in "b, c, e, f, g,h and i", measurements of hyoid bone between each bone type were not statistically significant (P>0.05).
Whereas for height of body of hyoid bone (g) statistically significant differences between the groups of 31-50 ages and 51-70 ages were presented (P< 0.05), according to age groups, other measurements of hyoid bone did not show a statistical difference(P>0.05).
Dissections have shown that the six main forms of hyoid bone can be macroscopically identified in the adults in Anatolian population: U,H,B, D ,V and HK types.
have considered the types of hyoid bone as symmetrical (85.7 %) and asymmetrical (15.3 %); Although their symmetrical type has included U (51.6 %) and V shaped hyoids (48.4 %), asymmetrical type has not been classified according to shapes of hyoid bone.
(1998), right greater cornu of the hyoid bone was noted to be elongated and was blocked by the lateral process of the cervical vertebra.
To determine accurate central positioning of the intubation guide surface, hyoid bone is a major anatomical landmark of neck .
The hyoid fractures due to inward compression such as manual strangulation, sudden hyperextension of the neck, anteroposterior compression such as hanging or direct blows to the neck and bullet wounds (Porrath), 34 % of cases of manual strangulation have a fractured hyoid bone (Ubelaker, 1992).
In his opinion, the Kebara hyoid bone lends credence to the notion that Neanderthals were capable of modern speech.