hyperalgesia


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Related to hyperalgesia: Hyperpathia, Neuropathic pain

hyperalgesia

[¦hī·pər·al′jē·zhə]
(physiology)
Increased or heightened sensitivity to pain stimulation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
16) Local administration of pentoxifylline causes inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine synthesis and antagonizes hyperalgesia in formalin-injected rats.
Fischer (1988) suggested that a compression force equivalent to more than 20 N between a painful site and a corresponding normal site is clinically significant and indicates the presence of hyperalgesia.
Chronic pain patients also experienced postoperative wound hyperalgesia at far higher rates than other patients (10 of 15 patients at 24 hours, compared with 20 of 85 in the no chronic pain group, and 8 of 15 patients at 48 hours, compared with 12 of 85 patients).
Neuropathic pain associated with peripheral nerve injury is particularly debilitating and characterized by allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain (Dworkin et al.
However, the team found that each receptor produces different signals; the one associated with bradykinin causing both hyperalgesia and persistent pain, whereas the one associated with substance P only caused hyperalgesia.
However, most of the primary analgesics used to alleviate postoperative pain have only minor effects on secondary hyperalgesia (16).
Stimulus-evoked pains such as mechanical and thermal allodynia and/or hyperalgesia may be present.
This entity is common in the limbs and is characterized by pain (spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, allodynia), active and passive movement disorders, abnormal regulation of blood flow and sweating, edema of skin and subcutaneous tissues, and trophic changes of skin, organs of skin and subcutaneous tissues.
In the presence of these symptoms, sensory abnormalities on physical examination, such as pinprick hyperalgesia and allodynia, can aid the diagnosis.
At first, the narcotic helps this pain, but over time tachyphylaxis and hyperalgesia set in, rendering the narcotic less and less effective and making the patient dependent on ever-escalating doses.
Evidence from animal work suggests that magnesium deficiency causes hyperalgesia through its effect on the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors.
Rats showing thermal hyperalgesia in a radiant heat test 1 wk postoperatively were used in Experiments 1 and 2: (1) Thermal hyperalgesia of irradiation group (n = 11) was less than that of the control or nonirradiation (n = 11) group at 1, 3, and 8 h after irradiation; however, the effect disappeared 12 h after irradiation.