hyperalgesia

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hyperalgesia

[¦hī·pər·al′jē·zhə]
(physiology)
Increased or heightened sensitivity to pain stimulation.
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Strain-dependent morphine-induced analgesic and hyperalgesic effects on thermal nociception in domestic fowl (Gallus gallus).
The hyperalgesic effect of naloxone is attenuated in streptozotocin-diabetic mice.
The application of thermal noxious stimuli forms the basis of some widely used tests to detect either hyperalgesic or analgesic reactions.
Changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission within the spinal cord, resulting from the expression and efficacy of glutamate transporters following nerve injury, contributes to hyperalgesic and allodynia (110-112).
They found that the compounds significantly reduced pain-related activities in isolated microglia, and that these compounds also significantly reversed hyperalgesic behaviour in the experimental rats.
Significant reduction in paw withdrawal and cold allodynia thresholds confirms nocifensive behavioural and hyperalgesic effect.
On-cells are inhibited by [micro]-opioids, which, along with other correlations observed between firing rate and various hyperalgesic phenomena, suggests that they are pronociceptive [15-17].
Unfortunately, there is no definitive physical pathology regarding FM; however, evidence suggests a number of physiological mechanisms including dysregulated pain modulation within the central nervous system, alteration of brainwave patterns affecting sleep, and a hyperalgesic response to nociception (Kosek, Ekholm & Hannson, 1996; Okifuji, Turk, & Marcus, 1999).
Bromelain also attenuates experimental contraction-induced skeletal muscle injury, (315) reduces production of hyperalgesic PG-E2 and substance P, (316) is generally effective in the amelioration of trauma-induced injury, edema, and inflammation, and is practically non-toxic.
Although neuroanatomic structures necessary for transmission of pain impulses are present in the fetus (Anand & Carr, 1989), immaturity in the pathways for transmission of the impulse and lack of inhibitory processes for such suggest that the infant may even be hyperalgesic (Fitzgerald, 1991b).
Analgesic and hyperalgesic effects of midazolam; dependence on route of administration.