hyperbolic orbit

hyperbolic orbit

[¦hī·pər‚bäl·ik ′ȯr·bət]
(astronomy)
The path of a body moving along a hyperbola, such as a body that is subject to the gravitational attraction of another body from which it has sufficient energy to escape, and that is otherwise undisturbed.
References in periodicals archive ?
And although its hyperbolic orbit originally led observers to conclude that it was a comet, additional images showed no trace of a comet tail, and it was reclassified as an interstellar asteroid.
It was obvious that the object has a hyperbolic orbit," he said, meaning that its trajectory is open-ended rather than elliptical like the objects in our solar system.
Comet PanSTARRS is on a slightly hyperbolic orbit, which means it seems to be a fresh body newly arriving from the distant Oort Cloud.
Ejections from Planet d have a low probability of impact on any other planet than itself, and most ejected particles would enter an initial hyperbolic orbit and be ejected from the planetary system," Brock said.
The projected object will leave Mars on a parabolic orbit or probably a hyperbolic orbit and probably assume an elliptical orbit about the Sun.
In the average planetary system, such forces may move a Jupiter-or Saturn-like body into a highly elliptical or hyperbolic orbit, or perhaps eject the planet altogether.
The comet is approaching on a slightly hyperbolic orbit, which means that it's making its first trip in from the Oort Cloud.
Because no one had ever seen a comet in a hyperbolic orbit, Oort concluded that somehow "new" comets must be part of the solar system.
Without doubt, says Pollok, Kant belongs to the group of those mathematical lay-people who were hardly able to master the details of, say, Newton's determination of elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic orbits, Leibniz's integration of mathematical formulas, or Euler's mathematico-mechanical analysis of the movement of solid or fluid bodies.
amp;nbsp; Unless there are serious problems with much of the astrometry listed below, strongly hyperbolic orbits are the only viable solutions.
Although there have been a few claims of possible interstellar comets, none have shown hyperbolic orbits that are a prerequisite for interstellar origin.
It had been observed that some long-period comets approached the Sun with hyperbolic orbits, making them appear to come from interstellar space.