Acidosis

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acidosis

[‚as·ə′dō·səs]
(medicine)
A condition of decreased alkali reserve of the blood and other body fluids.

Acidosis

 

a change in the acid-alkaline balance of the organism as a result of insufficient removal and oxidation of organic acids (for example, beta-hydroxybutyric acid). Usually these products are rapidly removed from the body. In febrile diseases, intestinal disorders, pregnancy, starvation, and such, they are retained in the body; this is manifested in mild cases by the appearance of acetoacetic acid and acetone in the urine (so-called ketonuria). In severe cases (for example, diabetes mellitus) it may lead to coma. Treatment consists of removal of the cause of acidosis (for example, by administering insulin in case of diabetes); there is also symptomatic treatment—soda and an abundance of fluids taken internally.

References in periodicals archive ?
They also showed that buffering hypercapnic acidosis worsens lung injury in a rabbit model of ischaemic reperfusion injury (5).
Pedoto et al have demonstrated hypercapnic acidosis to worsen lung injury and cause haemodynamic instability in a rat model (21).
CLINICAL STUDIES EVALUATING HYPERCAPNIA AND HYPERCAPNIC ACIDOSIS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME
Kregenow et al, in their retrospective review of an ARDS network study, found that hypercapnic acidosis was associated with reduced 28-day mortality in the 12 ml/kg predicted body weight, tidal volume group after controlling for comorbidities and severity of lung injury (30).
Contrary to these results, prospective randomised controlled trials have raised concerns of the harmful effects of hypercapnia and hypercapnic acidosis (6,31,32).
Based on these data suggesting detrimental effects of hypercapnic acidosis associated with low volume/pressure-limited ventilation, the ARDS Network investigators (1) managed hypercapnic acidosis aggressively, aiming to keep pH >7.
In summary, while the effect of low volume ventilation was proved to be beneficial, the effects of hypercapnia and hypercapnic acidosis remain unclear and potentially harmful.