hypercholesteremia


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hypercholesteremia

[¦hī·pər·kə‚les·tə′rē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Elevated cholesterol levels in the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Japan, patients with dyslipidemia, a lifestyle disease, are on an increasing trend, stimulating demand for hypercholesteremia treatments including Lochol.
The study participants' medical problems--including hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesteremia, and arthritis--were well controlled.
The effects of a low fat diet high in monounsaturated fatty acids on serum lipids, apolipoproteins, and lipoproteins in postmenopausal women with hypercholesteremia. Ph.D.
According to the guideline targets, 47% of the patients had hypertension, 44% had hypercholesteremia, and 27% were obese.
A family practitioner, on seeing a twenty-five-year-old patient with a cholesterol level of 650, should suspect the genetic disorder, familial hypercholesteremia.(25) A pediatrician can, with great accuracy, diagnose whether a child has the chromosomal disorder Down syndrome without doing any biochemical tests, through the child's appearance and, later, behavior.
ED often is a symptom of other medical conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, vascular disease, hypertension, hypercholesteremia, pelvic trauma and surgery, medications, and tobacco.
Of the HIV-positive patients who were hospitalized for CHD, 59% had hypertension, 15% had diabetes, 54% had hypercholesteremia, and 41% smoked cigarettes, Dr.
These objectives would also have an impact on the incidence of hypercholesteremia. Baselines indicate that 66% of youth from 10-17 years in 1984 participated in vigorous physical exercise three times a week for 20-minute periods.
These included smoking among men, never having had a blood pressure measurement, hypertension, never having had breast and cervical cancer screening tests, and hypercholesteremia. In comparison, the prevalence for use of alcohol was lower among Chinese than among the total California population.
Until we ensure that all Americans have received screening for preventable or early-stage illnesses, effective health advice about changing behavioral risk factors, and adequate chemoprophylaxis (ie, immunizations, hormone replacement, and treatment for hypertension and hypercholesteremia), the promise of clinical medicine remains unrealized.
Logistic regression analysis was carried out to identify correlates of hypertension by including predictive variables such as gender, age group, income, educational status, employment, family history of hypertension and comorbidities, diabetes, and hypercholesteremia (self-reported).