hypercoagulability


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hypercoagulability

[‚hī·pər·kō‚ag·yə·lə′bil·əd·ē]
(medicine)
Coagulation of blood more rapidly than normal.
References in periodicals archive ?
These abnormal values could help to define the underlying state of hypercoagulability in these patients.
Criteria of hypercoagulability were found exclusively in cats from group 2 and group 3.
Causes for hypercoagulability during catatonic states include:
Taking into account this case report and the incidence of thromboembolic events in human patients with IBD, further studies are required to investigate the rate of thromboembolism or hypercoagulability in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease.
Laboratory evaluation for hypercoagulability in patients with and without DVT Laboratory abnormality Patients without Patients with DVT DVT (n = 158) (n = 5) Pro C[R] Global < 0.7 53 (33) 1 (20) IgM antiphospholipid antibody- 4 (2) 1 (20) positive (>15 IU) IgG antiphospholipid antibody- 1 0 positive Antithrombin < 200 mg/l 4 (2) 0 Protein C < 70% 26 (16) 2 (40) Protein S < 60% 36 (23) 2 (40) Data presented as n (%); DVT, deep venous thrombosis Table IV.
We herein report our experience with 12 HIV-seropositive subjects with laboratory-confirmed evidence of protein S deficiency, with and without venous or arterial thrombosis, and discuss the diagnostic approach to hypercoagulability in HIV infection, and the clinical management of thromboembolic complications in patients with protein S deficiency.
A model called "Virchow's Triad" illustrates three broad categories of factors: circulatory stasis, injury, and hypercoagulability (thick blood).
During the early phases of our study hypercoagulability screening was performed on all patients.
All patients receiving estrogens should be carefully observed for signs of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypercoagulability, or diabetes.
These include nocturnal hypoxemia, hypercapnia, a tremendous increase in sympathetic nerve activity, hypertensive surges, endothelial dysfunction, vascular oxidative stress, inflammation, hypercoagulability, and markedly elevated left ventricular wall stress.
However, this effect on its own is insufficient to explain the thrombosis because thalidomide alone does not predispose to significant venous thrombosis even in hypercoagulability states.
Vessel injury from the spinal cord injury, surgery after injury, immobilization and paralysis can all lead to venous stasis, hypercoagulability and vessel injury - three factors collectively referred to as Virchow's Triad (Campagnolo and Merli 2002, Kumar et al 2003, Lee et al 2002, Merli et al 1993, Svensson et al 1995).