flexion

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flexion

[′flek·shən]
(biology)
Act of bending, especially of a joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
A digital photograph was taken of the knee using an hp 435 photosmart digital camera (3.1 megapixels) (Hewlett Packard, Palo Alto, CA, USA), while the knee was in hyperflexion, along with a reference scale so that the geometry of the notch could be determined.
The mechanism of traumatic OCD is poorly defined but is always associated with sudden, high-energy deceleration forces resulting in hyperextension, hyperflexion, translation, and/or rotation of the upper cervical spine causing the ligamentous disruption [3, 5, 22-25].
Prior to surgery the right forelimb showed a hyperflexion of the fetlock and carpal joints and weight bearing on the dorsal aspect of the fetlock joint.
Shearing of the relatively immobile vessel from acceleration/deceleration forces and hyperflexion or hyperextension of the neck cause intimal injury, and these tears can become a nidus for thrombus development [4].
Each subject's functional range of motion (ROM) was set electronically between full extension (0[degrees]) and 120[degrees] of knee flexion to prevent hyperextension and hyperflexion. Gravitational corrections were made to account for the effect of limb weight on torque measurements.
Most cases of SCIWORA occur in cervical spine owing to its hypermobility and increased vulnerability to trauma.6 RTA and fall from height have been reported as the most common causes by far.7 Pang and Wilberger described hyperflexion, hyperextension, longitudinal distraction and ischaemia as the most probable mechanisms involved in the development of SCIWORA.
Anotia, branchignathia, archinia, limb hyperflexion, laparoschisis, paw dysplasia, amelia and branched tail Omphalocoele at 22g/g B.W.
Radiographic TL in relation to spine did not change from lateral to hyperflexion positions.
The car accident of the deceleration type or the presence of the seat belt may have affected the vertebral column of our patient, and hyperextension followed by hyperflexion may be the reason of the chylous injury.
This condition can be diagnosed antenatally by scanning with the following features: polyhydramnios (seen in this case), echogenic amniotic fluid, fetal growth restriction, eyes closed with eversion of the eyelids and lips (ectropion and eclabion, respectively), flat nose, mouth wide open, ears not well formed, flexion of extremities, mottled, breeched skin of the face and limbs, hyperflexion of fingers and toes, absence of opening movements of fingers (1).
Furthermore, the authors suggested that using flexible reamers prevent the complications associated with knee hyperflexion, short femoral tunnels and peroneal nerve injury in straight and rigid reamers.