hypergene

hypergene

[′hī·pər‚jēn]
(genetics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The hydrothermal breccia facies at the top of the quartz porphyry is main ore-bearing lithofacies and is direct evidence of an explosive hypergene environment.
Because of the hypergene emplacement of Changfagou porphyry, the solubility of [H.sub.2]O and other volatiles decreased in the magma, and boiling of the magma resulted in the formation of an independent fluid phase.
M2 EQUITYBITES-June 8, 2016-Monterro Invests in Swedish Software Firm Hypergene
8 June 2016 - Sweden-based software company investor Monterro, through its Monterro 2 fund, has acquired 60% of the Swedish software company Hypergene, the company said.
This disease has been associated with the accumulation of mutations including those in the K-ras, APC, and p53 genes as well as with deletions and gains in various chromosomes, in addition to epigenetic changes such as those related with hypo- and hypergene methylation [2].
The graphical genotype of each line was established and the percentage of ZYQ8 genome was estimated by HYPERGENE (Young et al., 1989).
The graphical genotypes of the RIL and DH lines were estimated by HYPERGENE software.
Senarmontite is a product of hypergene alteration of stibnite and native antimony, occurring along the margins of these minerals (Andras et al., 1993b).
[BC.sub.2][S.sub.1] lines were first graphically represented using the program Hypergene (Young and Tanksley, 1989).
Hypergene: http://www.hypergene.net/ [fecha de consulta: 10 de marzo de 2013]
(2003): "We Media: How audiences are shaping the future of news and information", en Hypergene: http://www.hypergene.net/wemedia/download/we_media.pdf.