hyperinflation

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hyperinflation

(ECONOMICS) an extreme type of INFLATION in which a very rapid exponential growth in prices occurs. The classic instance of hyperinflation was in Germany in 1923. But there have been many instances since, e.g. Hungary in 1946, when a daily doubling of prices occurred, and Argentina in the period after the Falklands War.
References in periodicals archive ?
Questions of safety are key inasmuch as its hyperinflationary levels at present have rendered the country into a warzone.
Its all-time high was 74 percent in July 1985 (a hyperinflationary time); its record low was 42 percent in both September 2016 and March 2018.
Currently, there is an international standard that discusses the treatment of accounting statements of companies operating in hyperinflationary economies: International Accounting Standard 29 (IAS, 2009)--Financial Reporting in Hyperinflationary Economies.
In addition, a central bank following the Taylor principle could end up on a hyperinflationary path where nominal interest rates and inflation increase forever.
Buying drugs, laundering money, evading capital controls, protecting your money in countries with hyperinflationary environments: these are all situations where cryptocurrencies can come in handy.
Fitch expects this trend to continue over the foreseeable future given the hyperinflationary conditions in Venezuela.
But hyperinflationary conditions have already existed, economists say, particularly as prices on some key goods and services have risen by more than 50 percent month over month, putting them out of reach of an increasing number of people.
This is in view of the fact that hyperinflationary trends have been associated with, and in fact, giving rise to weaker Naira.
South Sudan's strategic position along the Nile River means fish is an important and prominent source of protein for people, under the impact of hyperinflationary pressures many can barely afford the high priced fish in the markets.
The resulting increase in demand for goods accelerates inflation even further." The authors conclude: "This hyperinflationary process cannot be categorized as 'monetary' in the usual sense, because that would have required an equally explosive expansion of [the] money supply, which was kept constant."
When that program was initiated, critics called it recklessly hyperinflationary; but it did not create even the modest 2% inflation the Fed was aiming for.
It prompted a hyperinflationary episode that began in December 2009 and continued into 2010.