hypernatremia


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Related to hypernatremia: hyponatremia

hypernatremia

[¦hī·pər·nə′trē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Excessive amounts of sodium in the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
A review of 116 cases of breastfeeding-associated hypernatremia in rural area of central Turkey.
Early recognition and management of the child with diabetes insipidus demands extremely close monitoring of fluid and electrolyte balance to prevent the complications associated with hypernatremia and dehydration.
However, the level of serum sodium was still within the normal range, and none of the patients manifested the signs or symptoms of hypernatremia.
The hypernatremia observed in this patient is thought to have been due to the [Na.
and osmolality levels during mannitol administration, subjects were divided into groups (hypernatremia, normonatremia, and hyponatremia), defined as follows: hypernatremia, [[Na.
Increased incidence of severe breast feeding malnutrition and hypernatremia in a metropolitan area.
Complications related to elevated sodium levels are rebound edema, congestive heart failure, decreased platelet aggregation and prolongation of coagulation, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, severe hypernatremia, and central pontine myelinolysis (Decaux & Soupart, 2003; Rabinstein, 2006).
TABLE 2 Recommended interventions for infant constipation (8) Laxative Dosage Side effects Glycerin Standard None reported suppositories Sorbitol-containing Variable None reported juices Barley malt 2-10 mL/240 mL Unpleasant odor extract milk or juice Corn syrup Variable None reported (light or dark) Lactulose 1-3 mL/kg per day, Flatulence, abdominal (70% solution) divided doses cramps, hypernatremia Sorbitol 1-3 mg/kg per day, Same as lactulose divided doses Laxative Comment Glycerin For rectal suppositories disimpaction Sorbitol-containing Prune, apple, pear juices Barley malt Suitable for extract bottle-feeding Corn syrup Not considered source of C.
Atypical presentations include delayed fever, delayed muscle rigidity, massive intestinal bleeding, massive CPK elevation (such as 46,420 U/L), and hyponatremia instead of hypernatremia.
005); high serum osmolality; hypovolemia; signs of dehydration; and hypernatremia.
The most serious consequence of hypertonic hypernatremia is a hypernatremic encephalopathy, which has an associated mortality rate of up to 50% (Kokko, 2000; Marino, 1998).