hyperplasia


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hyperplasia

(hī'pərplā`zhə): see hypertrophyhypertrophy
, enlargement of a tissue or organ of the body resulting from an increase in the size of its cells. Such growth accompanies an increase in the functioning of the tissue. In normal physiology the growth in size of muscles (e.g.
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.

Hyperplasia

 

an increase in the number of structural elements of tissues or organs. In man and animals, hyperplasia is based on the intensified reproduction of cells and the formation of new structures. Hyperplasia is observed in various types of pathological growth of tissues (chronic productive inflammation and tumor), in regeneration, and in hypertrophy. Hyperplasia often carries with it compensating characters. In plants, it may be a local growth of tissues resulting from mitotic or amitotic cell division. It occurs with infection by destructive or pathogenic organisms, during trauma, and under the influence of growth stimulants, pesticides, and other preparations. The result of hyperplasia is the formation of galls, calluses, and warts.

hyperplasia

[‚hī·pər′plā·zhə]
(medicine)
Increase in cell number causing an increase in the size of a tissue or organ.
References in periodicals archive ?
Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: female pseudohermaphroditism and virilization.
Papillary endothelial hyperplasia (Masson's tumor) in children.
CT with three-dimensional reconstruction is essential to differentiate coronoid process hyperplasia from other conditions, such as ankylosis, neoplastic coronoid (chondroma or osteochondroma), traumas, and thickened, but not elongated, coronoid processes.
Keywords: Postmenopausal Bleeding, Endometrial Hyperplasia, Adenocarcinoma.
Above 90% of myasthenia gravis cases had abnormal thymus including 70% thymic lymphoid hyperplasia and 20% thymoma [4].
Final pathology revealed inactive endometrium with no hyperplasia or atypia (Figure 6).
First reported by Snover et al., reactive lymphoid hyperplasia has been reported in many organs in the body and rarely in the liver [6, 7].
Various enzyme deficiencies are responsible for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with 21-hydroxy-lase deficiency being the most frequent culprit.
Endometrial hyperplasia and polyps are the most common patterns seen in the age group of 35 years.
Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a benign proliferative lesion of the breast stroma which was first described by Vuitch et al in 1986 (1).
Fibroadenomatoid hyperplasia may occur as a localized or diffuse lesion; it is observed in approximately 5-7% of all benign surgical biopsy samples from Japanese and American women (HANSON et al., 1987).