hyperplasia

(redirected from hyperplasias)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

hyperplasia

(hī'pərplā`zhə): see hypertrophyhypertrophy
, enlargement of a tissue or organ of the body resulting from an increase in the size of its cells. Such growth accompanies an increase in the functioning of the tissue. In normal physiology the growth in size of muscles (e.g.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Hyperplasia

 

an increase in the number of structural elements of tissues or organs. In man and animals, hyperplasia is based on the intensified reproduction of cells and the formation of new structures. Hyperplasia is observed in various types of pathological growth of tissues (chronic productive inflammation and tumor), in regeneration, and in hypertrophy. Hyperplasia often carries with it compensating characters. In plants, it may be a local growth of tissues resulting from mitotic or amitotic cell division. It occurs with infection by destructive or pathogenic organisms, during trauma, and under the influence of growth stimulants, pesticides, and other preparations. The result of hyperplasia is the formation of galls, calluses, and warts.

hyperplasia

[‚hī·pər′plā·zhə]
(medicine)
Increase in cell number causing an increase in the size of a tissue or organ.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Endometrial carcinoma Hyperplasia PTEN expression Atypia Early event.
Endometrial hyperplasia is usually associated with prolonged unopposed oestrogen stimulation and is characterised by increased gland-to-stroma ratio and abnormalities of epithelial growth relative to normal endometrium.
Despite the expression of cytokines in pathogenesis of endometrial hyperplasia was studied by many scientists, the published data remain controversial.
Few studies outline using of this technique in the diagnosis of endometrial hyperplasia.
When the findings were broken down according to the specific type of atypical hyperplasia, 33 women with atypical ductal hyperplasia developed breast cancer.
The risk of developing breast cancer was roughly twice as great 10 years or longer following a benign biopsy featuring atypical ductal hyperplasia as in the first 10 years of follow-up.
003), with 2 major groups: complex hyperplasia and carcinoma vs proliferative, secretory, and simple hyperplasia.
There was no difference in intensity between complex hyperplasia and carcinoma (P = .
The overall risk of progression of hyperplasia to cancer is 5-10%.
This is in keeping with previous suggestions that atrophy appears to precede hyperplasia in nodular regenerative hyperplasia.
Out of the 116 cases studied; the most common cause of bleeding in the postmenopausal age group was endometrial hyperplasia 41 out of 116(35.
In the present study perimenopausal age group is taken into consideration as it is the most common age group presenting with uterine bleeding [1,2,3,4,5,6,7] and also meticulous evaluation is required in these age group, as there is increased incidence of hyperplasia is more common.