hyperplasia

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hyperplasia

(hī'pərplā`zhə): see hypertrophyhypertrophy
, enlargement of a tissue or organ of the body resulting from an increase in the size of its cells. Such growth accompanies an increase in the functioning of the tissue. In normal physiology the growth in size of muscles (e.g.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hyperplasia

 

an increase in the number of structural elements of tissues or organs. In man and animals, hyperplasia is based on the intensified reproduction of cells and the formation of new structures. Hyperplasia is observed in various types of pathological growth of tissues (chronic productive inflammation and tumor), in regeneration, and in hypertrophy. Hyperplasia often carries with it compensating characters. In plants, it may be a local growth of tissues resulting from mitotic or amitotic cell division. It occurs with infection by destructive or pathogenic organisms, during trauma, and under the influence of growth stimulants, pesticides, and other preparations. The result of hyperplasia is the formation of galls, calluses, and warts.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hyperplasia

[‚hī·pər′plā·zhə]
(medicine)
Increase in cell number causing an increase in the size of a tissue or organ.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relation between PTEN scoring and intensity with endometrial hyperplasias with and without atypia and endometrioid carcinoma using chi square test (p value).
Diagnostic Studies in Non-classical Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia
In cases of non-atypical hyperplasias the recommended treatment is cyclical progestins therapy whereas in patients with atypical hyperplasias hysterectomy is the recommendation.
Endometrial biopsy and curettage have become accepted methods of evaluating of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial carcinoma [4, 5].
Postatrophic hyperplasia is also referred to as nodular hyperplasia or lobular atrophy.
Only about 60% of the breast cancers that develop in women with either atypical lobular hyperplasia or atypical ductal hyperplasia occur in the ipsilateral breast.
In the present study, out of 41 cases of endometrial hyperplasias 35 were non-atypical and 6 were atypical.
Immunophenotypic and genotypic analysis in cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasias. J Am Acad Dermatol.
There are nine main categories, which are arranged according to the acronym PALM-COEIN: Polyp; adenomyosis; leiomyoma; malignancy and hyperplasia; coagulopathy; ovulatory dysfunction; endometrial; iatrogenic; and not yet classified.
The cases studied were divided into the following groups: proliferative endometrium (n = 10), secretory endometrium (n = 10), endometrial hyperplasia (n = 40; 30 with no atypia, 10 with atypia), and carcinoma (n = 40; 20 endometrioid, 10 serous, and 10 clear cell).
In the perimenopausal age group (Table 3), the commonest diagnoses were proliferative pattern (23%) followed by simple hyperplasia (16.2%), secretory pattern (14.9%), complex hyperplasia (10.8%) and disordered proliferative endometrium (6.8%).