hyperrationality


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hyperrationality

  1. the one-sided application of systems-level rationality at the expense of the ‘rationality’ of the ‘life-world’ – INTERNAL COLONIZATION OF THE LIFE-WORLD.
  2. the ‘unprecedented’, and ‘far greater degree’ of reliance, on ‘rationality which Ritzer and Lemoyne (1991) see as decisive in the Japanese postwar economic ‘miracle’. For these authors, Japanese success, and the creation of‘hyperrationality’, has its origins in a fusion of Western and indigenous systems of ‘formal rationality’ with ‘substantive, theoretical and practical rationality’. See also JAPANIZATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, investigations of this story tend to bridge a critique of hyperrationality into an interpretation of some other corollary effect thereof.
holds "an intense skepticism concerning hyperrationality .
But the problem with programming the future, as opposed to planning for it, is that programming is an attempt to eliminate human judgment, to bring the future into the present by means of hyperrationality, as we bring the past into the present by means of hyperreality.
We can in fact define hyperrationality as the search for the action that would have been optimal if one ignored the costs of the search itself" (esta idea ha sido trabajada con anterioridad en otros textos suyos como en The cement of society)
As these examples suggest, however, there is a problem with our hyperrationality.
46) Modern hyperrationality can end in ultra-violence just as "primitive barbarism" can, as "our esteem for facts has not neutralised in us all religiousness.
In an age that has reacted very negatively against what it regards as the hyperrationality of neo-Scholastic discourse, it is not unusual to hear the exhortation that theology must be sapiential, that it must be oriented toward wisdom.
In hyperrationality and hypercivilization is as much dangerous imbalance (or violation of Maat) as in the bestiality by which humanity has so often been tempted to destroy itself.
Directly associated to this idea of humility is ecopoetry's third characteristic: "an intense skepticism concerning hyperrationality, that usually leads to an indictment of an overtechnologized modern world and a warning concerning the very real potential for ecological catastrophe" (6) "God's Grandeur" investigates this potential by portraying a natural world rejected by a mankind too concerned with its own devices.
I begin the analysis with some highly unrealistic assumptions about the hyperrationality of savers and then relax them after the mechanics of the model are clear.
Jamieson 1988) have lionized logical coherence and hyperrationality in politics.