hyperreality


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hyperreality

‘the world of self-referential signs’ – ‘the new linguistic condition of society’, according to BAUDRILLARD, in which the alleged ‘real’ is no more real than the thing which feigns it.
References in periodicals archive ?
This superpanopicon surveillance system is nothing more than a new facet of capitalism, whose stake passes from the register of money and commodities, into that of information authority, thus creating an informational and control superpanopticism that places us in a hyperreality of events and a simulacrum of meaning.
A sign no longer relies itself to the referral reality, but rather to develop itself in the realm of pure simulacrum which make up the world of hyperreality.
I believe such a short step is enabled by the effect of hyperreality in Walpole's use of laughter.
The emperor's new clothes: Hyperreality and the study of Latin.
Nick Perry in his Hyperreality and Global Culture proposes that Borges's story "Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius" is as a better allegory for simulation that culminates in the third order of simulacrum, hyper-reality: "the implication, which grows throughout the story, is, of course, that Tlon is the (hyperreal) world which we (erratically) inhabit and which (erratically) inhabits us.
The concept of HyperReality (HR), like the concepts of nanotechnology, cloning and artificial intelligence, is in principle very simple.
One has a feeling of having lived an overpowering, grand experience, an exhilarating wave of hyperreality.
The intended hyperreality (41) of this creation is seen in the official guidebooks that describe the plaster and canvas buildings as though they were authentic, while a story by Neil Munro that was published in the Glasgow livening News in May 1911 shows how visitors willingly colluded in creation of an image:
Post-colonial hermeneutics entails a substantial moment of decentring the centred narrative and knowledge-power system, underlying sociohistorical, critical analysis of politics, hyperreality of global economy, and social discourse propagated through mass media.
Close-up visuals glisten with hyperreality - from a John Cena glare to the details of Randy Orton's tattoos.
John Fiske (1996, 2) describes hyperreality as an "implosive" concept wherein "the binary concepts of reality and representation" are imploded into "a single concept.
On a deeper level, the film is also an analysis of a very real American cultural hegemony, and the dynamics of simulacra and hyperreality that form an important part of that culture.