hypervelocity


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hypervelocity

[‚hī·pər·və′läs·əd·ē]
(mechanics)
Muzzle velocity of an artillery projectile of 3500 feet per second (1067 meters per second) or more.
Muzzle velocity of a small-arms projectile of 5000 feet per second (1524 meters per second) or more.
Muzzle velocity of a tank-cannon projectile in excess of 3350 feet per second (1021 meters per second).
References in periodicals archive ?
This volume collects 60 papers from the March 2007 Second International Symposium on Explosion, Shock Wave and Hypervelocity Phenomena in Materials, organized by the Kumamoto University's (Japan) Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, 21st Century COE Program on Pulsed Power Science, and Faculty of Engineering in cooperation with Japan Explosive Society's Technical Section of Explosion and Impulsive Processing and the Japan Society for Technology of Plasticity's Committee of the High-Energy-Rate Forming.
The objective of this special-topic volume was to disseminate work on current trends in Explosion, Shock Wave and Hypervelocity Phenomena in Materials.
But unlike the army's howitzer-adapted Hypervelocity Projectile, firing a railgun of this magnitude requires nothing less than a (http://www.
When you think about directed energy weapons, potentially powdered cannons with hypervelocity rounds and a variety of others, where you can mass a defense against an incoming threat, whether it is [a] cruise missile or ballistic missile.
Sponsored by ARPA and the Army, this program aimed at producing "a small and lightweight, spin stabilized, optically guided interceptor that achieves hypervelocity direct impact kill of reentry vehicles in the exoatmosphere.
On 6 August 2002, a ballistic test firing of Raytheon's Hypervelocity Anti-Tank Missile (Hatm) took place in Norway.
The network selects one of these vehicles for the shot, and moments later a hypervelocity missile roars out of one of the canisters.
A 42-kJ HPG has been used to power a mechanical impact test system for projectiles prior to launch at a hypervelocity test range at Arnold Engineering Development Test Center at the Arnold Air Force Base in Tennessee [8].
Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, used a software object manager to simulate hypervelocity projectiles striking a solid surface in a project funded by the Defense Research Projects Agency, Washington, DC.
The scope of work under this new contract has been expanded to include two additional facilities: AEDC's Hypervelocity Tunnel 9 in White Oak, Maryland, and the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) located at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California.
Tender issueThe objectives of this study is to numerically characterize the debris cloud distribution that results from orbital hypervelocity collision of a satellite with a secondary object of various sizes up to a complete satellite.