hypha

(redirected from hyphal)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to hyphal: hyphae

hypha

[′hī·fə]
(mycology)
One of the filaments composing the mycelium of a fungus.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mycelial phase begins after 48 hours; during the mycelial phase, hyphal bodies develop from inside to outside the host's carcass, with the appearance of white cotton-like mycelia after 96 hours, culminating with the conidia completely covering the cadaver when the disease cycle is completed (green muscardine phase), as is illustrated in Figure 6b.
In our observations more variance occurred in the width of the hyphal zonations than that is reported in previously published accounts (Lowy, 1952; Kobayasi, 1981).
Two isolates produced rough, yellowish-brown colonies with peripheral hyphal fringes after incubation for 72 hours at 30[degrees]C and determined to C.
In addition, a negative correlation between AM density and invasive plant (knapweed) cover was recorded (Lutgen & Rillig, 2004) by demonstrating that areas with high knapweed density generally had lower glomalin concentration and AM hyphal length compared with areas having no or less knapweed cover.
Under these conditions, germlings fail to grow beyond the germ tube state of development, due to rupture of hyphal tips and uncontrolled spillage of cytoplasm.
On cropland, she found that both tillage and tallowing--as is common in arid regions such as those in the Northern Plains--lower glomalin levels by destroying living hyphal networks.
The wetted boards were then sprayed with a mixture of spores and hyphal fragments of Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma harzianum, and Ophiostoma piceae.
1990), and stimulate hyphal branching of the AMF, Gigaspora gigantea (Nagahashi and Douds 2004).
Transmission of these fungi is through hyphal infection of the seed embryo and aleurone layer during seed development.
The idea that microsymbionts may provide some of the "sponge bioactive molecules" sparked when bacteria and several hyphal fungi isolated in laboratory cultures from sponges and other marine animals yielded not only new natural products, but also compounds identical or related to those formerly attributed to their hosts (e.
We know that exposures are not just to intact spores but also to hyphal and spore fragments which contain antigen or allergen.