hyphenation


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hyphenation

Breaking words that extend beyond the right margin. Software hyphenates words by matching them against a hyphenation dictionary or by using a built-in set of rules, or both. See discretionary hyphen.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Computer scientists of the time proposed methods of automating various processing of text, such as lexical analysis, language translation, revising manuscripts, sorting, indexing, and automatic hyphenation. (16)
The Kochi-Muziris Biennale is an inheritor of this cosmopolitanism of holding together, of hyphenation. Even so, we recognize that this inheritance is a fragile one, has been in the making over centuries, and has been preserved and defended with care and courage.
Jimmy's university, the Martha Graham Academy, is named after a single modern dancer, and hence its hyphenation as Martha-Graham in the text seems to be an editorial attempt to make it consistent with the Watson-Crick Institute, which Crake attended--a small disruption in a useful discussion of the increasing disconnect between humanities and STEM education that will be sadly familiar to the audience most likely to read this book.
Moreover, Macedo astutely interrogates the "people of color" category that renders Whiteness invisible and in turn, points to the hyphenation (i.e., Mexican-American, African-American, Asian-American) process as recognition that this is an illustration of those that have not been given full citizenship.
Section 3 offers a preliminary corpus-based investigation of hyphenation sequences in LPD and CELEX.
Until Turkish Cypriots and Greek Cypriots throw off their ethnic hyphenation, they will make the mistake of the UK and the USA, where your ethnicity is hung round your neck like a placard for all of your life: "British Muslim" or "African American".
Elisabeth Dambock then analyses India as a product of the western imagination in the present context in "Exoticism Stops at the Second Hyphen," where she argues, in tune with Graham Huggan, that globalisation's alterity industry produces homogenised forms of the "exotic." Dambock's argument is powerfully clear: single hyphenation invites to exoticisation whilst multiple hyphenation explores this process at a deeper level.
Nowadays, companies are merging and allowing open access to their instruments, which allows this hyphenation to be done easily.
This "hyphenation," where one belongs to two world religions at once, leads to such questions as whether it is possible for one person to fully comprehend two traditions at once.
For others, it's safer to specify the nationalities involved through hyphenation, e.g.