hypnotize

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Related to hypnotizability: hypnosis

hypnotize

[′hip·nə‚tīz]
(psychology)
To induce a state of hypnosis.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brain oscillations, hypnosis, and hypnotizability. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis.
The TAS has been shown to correlate with psychological constructs such as hypnotizability, imagery, daydreaming, and ASC, which have been reviewed elsewhere (Roche & McConkey, 1990).
It's a very subjective experience that varies depending on the degree of hypnotizability. Some people say it feels like an altered state of consciousness.
The present study was designed to comprehensively examine the relationships of selected sleep positions with Zuckerman-Kuhlman's big five characteristics, hypnotizability, creativity, and styles of creativity.
The authors discussed several limitations with this pilot study: the small sample size, the limited range of hypnotizability in the CBT-hypnosis group, the high dropout rate in the control group (8 out of 14), and the lack of long-term follow-up assessments.
Hilgard (1992) in his studies on hypnotic states of people, who had a high degree of hypnotizability, saw that when a hypnotist gives a suggestion which the subject cannot perceive as certain stimuli (e.g., painful, auditory, or tactile), these stimuli are actually registered in the subject's memory and can be recalled in hypnosis later.
On the degree of stability of measured hypnotizability over 25 year period.
Treating the diagnosis of dissociative identity disorder through measures of dissociation, absorption, hypnotizability and PTSD: A Norwegian pilot study.
79) said, "I hypothesize that shamanic rituals constitute hypnotic inductions, that shamanic performances provide suggestions, that client responses are equivalent to responses produced by hypnosis, and that responses to shamanic treatment are correlated with patient hypnotizability." Dennett (2006) has proposed that the ailments tribe members go to the healer for are those that are particularly likely to benefit from symbolic treatment (for example, stress and the symptoms of stress).