hypnotize

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hypnotize

[′hip·nə‚tīz]
(psychology)
To induce a state of hypnosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was already in the 80s and 90s some pioneer work that found relative shifts in activity amongst high hypnotizables from the left to right parieto-occipital areas, along with an increase in theta (Crawford, Clark, & Kitner-Triolo, 1988; Unestahl & Blundzen, 1996).
As they explain, there are two distinct groups of hypnotizable subjects, the group of high dissociative highly suggestible (HDHS) and the group of low dissociative highly suggestible (LDHS) subjects.
Practitioners considering exorcism should first read Wilson and Barber's (1983) treatise on highly hypnotizable persons (i.
As many of the studies used only a few highly selected and highly hypnotizable participants, there are several alternatives to consider: Hypnotic psi may be part of the virtuoso performance; it may be that the hypnotic procedure with its positive expectancy is a means of enhancing an already existing potential; or as Stanford and Stein seem ready to endorse, hypnotic induction per se may have no effect beyond a person-by-situation interaction (Stanford & Stein, 1994, p.
Kallio and his colleagues studied a middle-aged, healthy and highly hypnotizable woman.
Further, there is a positive correlation between hypnotic susceptibility and autonomic responsiveness during hypnosis, with high hypnotizable subjects showing a trend toward a greater increase of vagal activation than do low hypnotizables.
This is characteristic of many highly hypnotizable patients.
Autonomic reactivity to cognitive and emotional stress of low, medium, and high hypnotizable healthy subjects: Testing predictions from the high risk model of threat perception.
Most adults, about two-thirds, are hypnotizable to some degree, though some people experience the effects of hypnosis more intensely than others do, says David Spiegel, a psychiatrist at Stanford University School of Medicine who uses hypnosis in his medical practice.
Furthermore, despite the similarities between ganzfeld and hypnosis there is no guarantee that all of those who are highly hypnotizable will be also highly responsive to ganzfeld.
54) For example, the highly hypnotizable patient can frequently control nausea and vomiting by hallucinating the taste of orange or mint and dissociating from negative environmental cues.