hypocapnia


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Related to hypocapnia: hypercapnia

hypocapnia

[¦hī·po′kap·nē·ə]
(medicine)
Reduced or subnormal blood levels of carbon dioxide.
References in periodicals archive ?
2] levels influences CBF and, in many bird species, hypercapnia increases CBF while hypocapnia causes no net change to CBF.
Classification of transient loss of consciousness Traumatic T-LOC * Concussion Non-traumatic T-LOC * Syncope * Epileptic seizure * Psychogenic pseudosyncope * Hypoglycaemia * Hypoxia * Hyperventilation with hypocapnia * Intoxication * Vertebrobasilar TIA T-LOC = transient loss of consciousness; TIA = transient ischaemic attack.
It's known that hypocapnia and respiratory alkalosis are almost immediate effects of hyperventilation, they lead to ischemia and hypoxia of the central nervous system (19).
A study in the Ukraine found that slowing breathing increased longevity of breast cancer patients: "It was established that elimination of hyperventilation and hypocapnia [low CO2] in patients with breast cancer (T1-2N1M0) after the completion of the special treatment led to increased three-year survival rate, better quality of life.
2012b) demonstrated that hypocapnia decreases the blood flow in both ocular blood flows during exhaustive exercise, in spite of retinal autoregulation.
Palmisano et al demonstrated that hypocapnia causes negative middle ear pressures that may lead to MEE.
Extrapolating from evidence in traumatic brain injury, hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia and hypocapnia must be avoided.
At this time the hypocapnia independent hypoxic ventilatory decline (HVD), which occurs during the first 5 to 30 minutes of a sustained hypoxic exposure, counteracts the initial HVR and reduces ventilation (25).
Hypokalemia probably results from increased kaliuresis due to renal tubular leakage, decreased proximal tubular reabsorption in the face of acidosis and hypocapnia, and aldosterone stimulation.
The background to this study was the observation that episodes of hyperoxaemia and hypocapnia may occur unintentionally in severely asphyxiated neonates in the first few hours of postnatal life.
This condition is related to recurring attacks of apnea, hypopnea and hyperpnea, sleep disruptions, arousals, intermittent hypoxemia, hypocapnia, and hypercapnia, and intrathoracic pressure changes.