hypochloremia


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hypochloremia

[¦hī·pō·klȯ′rē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Reduction in the amount of blood chlorides.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results showed mild anemia and hypoproteinemia in 1 bird, increased creatine kinase activity in 1 bird, and similar electrolyte disturbances in all birds (moderate hyponatremia and hypochloremia in 3 birds, hyperkalemia in 2 birds).
The development of hypochloremia while the patient is in the ICU is a frequent event and it is associated with a 2-fold mortality versus patients that do not develop hypochloremia.
Hypocalcemia, hypophostaemia, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypochloremia might be due to GIT stasis and less assimilation of feed materials as a result of long standing anorexia (Radostits et al., 2010).
However, labs demonstrated severe hypercalcemia, pancreatitis, and acute kidney injury: a corrected serum calcium of 16.9 mg/dL (ionized calcium 2.05), hyponatremia, hypochloremia, creatinine 1.4 mg/dL, BUN 41 mg/dL, amylase 334 U/L, lipase > 3000 U/L, WBC 15.8 K/[mm.sup.3], and Hgb 9.7 g/dL.
When detected, CCD results in severe watery diarrhea and the rennin-angiotensin system is activated leading to hypochloremia, hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis (1).
Introduction: Pseudo-Bartter's syndrome (PBS) is a clinical entity characterized by hypokalemia, hypochloremia associated with metabolic alkalosis.
The impact of acute large volume CL includes the loss of protein, fat, and fat-soluble vitamins, trace elements, and lymphocytes in quantities that result in hypovolemia, electrolyte imbalances (hyponatremia, hypochloremia, and hypoproteinemia), malnutrition, and immunosuppression [8, 39, 42, 43].
The rest of his serum chemistries, including complete blood count, were normal on presentation with the exception of hypochloremia (81 mmol/L).
Laboratory investigations revealed severe hyponatremia (106 mMol/L), hypokalemia (3 mMol/L), and hypochloremia (54 mMol/L).
He was diagnosed with dehydration, hypernatremia, hypochloremia, rhabdomyolysis, catatonic schizophrenia, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia.
We used definitions based on the POC device normal values and standard definitions for abnormalities: hypokalemia, [K.sup.+] <3.5 mmol/L; moderate hypokalemia, [K.sup.+] 2.5-3.0 mmol/L; severe hypokalemia, [K.sup.+] <2.5 mmol/L; hyperkalemia, K+ >5.0 mmol/L; hyponatremia, [Na.sup.+] <135 mmol/L; hypernatremia, [Na.sup.+] >146 mmol/L; hypochloremia, Cl<98; high anion gap, >20; low TC[O.sub.2], <24 mmol/L; low glucose, <70 mg/dL; high glucose >180 mg/dL; creatinine and BUN: mild increase, 1.0-1.5 times the upper limit of normal (ULN); moderate increase, 1.5-3.0 times ULN; severe, >3.0 times ULN; increased BUN/creatinine ratio, >20; and hypocalcemia, i[Ca.sup.2+] <1.12 mmol/L.