hypoproliferative anemia

hypoproliferative anemia

[¦hī·pō·prə′lif·rəd·iv ə′nē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Decreased concentration of hemoglobin and number of red blood cells due to subnormal numbers of erythrocyte primordial cells in relation to the stimulus of anemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
12] values between 200 and 300pg per milliliter and in the presence of normal folic acid level, in lieu of estimation of Homocysteine and methylamalonic acid, ancillary evidences like hypoproliferative anemia characterized by marked macrocytosis, hypersegmentation of neutrophils, pancytopenia, and signs of ineffective erythropoiesis (Such as elevated level LDH and indirect bilirubin) were assessed.
Anemia of chronic disease (ACD), also known as anemia of inflammation, is a hypoproliferative anemia that develops in response to systemic illness or inflammation such as infection, cancer, and autoimmune conditions.
Chronic kidney disease is associated with hypoproliferative anemia from failure to produce adequate amounts of the hormone to stimulate erythrocyte production in the bone marrow.
Renal failure is often associated with a decreased erythropoietin output resulting in hypoproliferative anemia.
The most extensively studied cytokines--tumor necrosis factor-[alpha], interleukin 1, interleukin 6, and interferon--contribute to hypoproliferative anemia either by altering the sensitivity of erythroid precursors to Epoetin alfa or by stimulating the production of proinflammatory proteins such as C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and serum amyloid A and decreasing levels of albumin and transferrin (Gunnell, Yeun, Depner, & Kaysen, 1999).