hypoproteinemia

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hypoproteinemia

[¦hī·pō‚prō·də′nē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Abnormally low levels of protein in the blood.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Number Complications of cases Systemic complications Pneumonia 11 Myocardial infarction 3 Cardiac failure 1 Urinary tract infection 8 Hypoproteinaemia 1 Deep venous thrombosis 0 Pulmonary embolism 1 Postoperative anaemia required transfusion 4 Local complications Deep infection 1 Lag screw cutout 1 Lag screw back out 1
Laboratory tests at the time of scintigraphy showed hypoproteinaemia (53 g/l) and hypoalbuminaemia (20 g/l).
Equine proliferative enteropathy: A cause of weight loss, colic, diarrhea and hypoproteinaemia in foals on three breeding farms.
HYPOPROTEINAEMIA: Large white patches on the nail bed, usually visible through the transparent nail.
The hypoproteinaemia resolved after correction of the cardiac defects.
Transudative effusions are mostly secondary to cardiac failure, cirrhosis liver, hypoproteinaemia etc.
Alongside the challenges of diagnosis and anaesthesia, surgical treatment and wound healing are compromised by intestinal wall viability, intraluminal bacterial overgrowth, ileus and hypoproteinaemia (Ralphs et al., 2003).
Laboratory studies showed hypokalaemia (K 2.51mmol/L), hyponatraemia (Na 122.1mmol/L, Cl 84mmol/L), and hypoproteinaemia (ALB 27.5g/L), a normal leukocyte count, normal TSH and FT4, FT3, increased levels of transaminases and ketonuria.
This is a rare but severe disorder characterised by heavy proteinuria, hypoproteinaemia and oedema presenting in the first 3 months of life.
A milder, more chronic form may present with emesis, diarrhoea, poor growth, anaemia, hypoproteinaemia and lethargy.
In 1998, the Cochrane Injuries Group Albumin Reviewers published a meta-analysis of 30 randomised controlled trials involving 1419 patients to quantify the effect of fluids containing human albumin on mortality in critically ill patients with hypovolaemia, burns or hypoproteinaemia (8).
Protein-losing enteropathy is defined as a condition in which excess protein loss into the gastrointestinal lumen is severe enough to produce hypoproteinaemia.