hyposensitivity


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Related to hyposensitivity: hypersensitivity

hyposensitivity

[‚hī·pō‚sen·sə′tiv·əd·ē]
(medicine)
Condition marked by diminished sensitivity to stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment for depression and rectal hyposensitivity could optimize the effects of BFT in DD patients.
Scott, "Fecal incontinence in men: coexistent constipation and impact of rectal hyposensitivity," Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, vol.
Cross, Copping, and Campbell (2011) reviewed the construct of impulsivity, and concluded that it could be defined in terms of three different facets: reward hypersensitivity (strongly tied to motivation), punishment hyposensitivity (low punishment avoidance), and inadequate effortful control.
In experimental animals, repeated or prolonged stress could lead to hyposensitivity of D2 presynaptic receptors.
(16) Because leptin levels correlate with body fat stores, and obese individuals have very high levels of leptin as well as hyposensitivity to leptin, clinical trials with leptin did not demonstrate efficacy, even at extremely high doses because of tolerance/resistance.
This is thought to be due to high levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor -1, which inhibit the formation of fibrinolytic plasmin from plasminogen.[1] These anomalies account for hypersensitivity of platelets to aggregants and hyposensitivity to antiaggregants and are thought to contribute to enhanced atherosclerosis via increased platelet activity at sites of vessel injury.
UC supernatant also promotes colonic hyposensitivity to distension, an effect can be mimicked by PAR-4 AP or Cat-G.
Ongoing rectal hyposensitivity may lead to faecal impaction, secondary dilation and the development of a megacolon.
(5) Self-report of sensory processing in ASD have also determined that these abnormalities persist well into adulthood and can be broadly categorised into hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity to visual stimuli.
Somatosensory impairments in individuals with CHARGE syndrome can range from hypersensitivity to hyposensitivity (limited feedback on joint and muscle position), which can reduce their ability to compensate for a perturbation to their balance.
Both hyposensitivity and hypersensitivity are exhibitedin the same individual [3, 8-10].
Oral problems might arise because of autism-related behaviours such as communication limitations, personal neglect, self-injurious behaviours, resistance to receiving dental care, hyposensitivity to pain and possible avoidance of social contact [Rean et al., 1999].