hyposensitivity


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Related to hyposensitivity: hypersensitivity

hyposensitivity

[‚hī·pō‚sen·sə′tiv·əd·ē]
(medicine)
Condition marked by diminished sensitivity to stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
5) Self-report of sensory processing in ASD have also determined that these abnormalities persist well into adulthood and can be broadly categorised into hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity to visual stimuli.
Somatosensory impairments in individuals with CHARGE syndrome can range from hypersensitivity to hyposensitivity (limited feedback on joint and muscle position), which can reduce their ability to compensate for a perturbation to their balance.
Oral problems might arise because of autism-related behaviours such as communication limitations, personal neglect, self-injurious behaviours, resistance to receiving dental care, hyposensitivity to pain and possible avoidance of social contact [Rean et al.
One researcher has indicated that "oversensitivity or hyposensitivity of the children to the pain, insufficient history to the explanation of the trauma's features, the time between the approval of the patient for physical examination and trauma's exact time may lead us to the diagnosis of battered child syndrome.
This complex of motor disorders can result in signs and symptoms such as loss of muscle tone of the cheeks and lips, resulting in sialorrhea (drooling) and prolonged oral clearance of food, trouble closing lips, unclear speech, bruxism, oral hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity, tongue thrust, biting on eating utensils during meals and dysphagia (difficulty swallowing).
16) On the other hand, those with hyposensitivity may be unable to feel anything without large stimuli.
It has also been reported that the loss of function of vha-12, a gene involved in necrosis-mediated neurodegeneration that is also expressed in DAergic neurons, leads to a hyposensitivity of C.
This lack of contingent relationships can produce hyposensitivity to contingencies of all types (Patterson, 2002).
Although there appears to be no known autism-specific oral manifestations, oral problems might arise because of autism-related behaviors such as communication limitations, personal neglect, self-injurious behaviors, dietary habits, effect of medications, resistance to receiving dental care, hyposensitivity to pain and possible avoidance of social contact.
A high score indicates hyposensitivity to pain or less awareness of it.