hypotonic

(redirected from hypotonicity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to hypotonicity: hypertonicity

hypotonic

[¦hī·pə′tän·ik]
(physiology)
Pertaining to subnormal muscle strength or tension.
Referring to a solution with a lower osmotic pressure than physiological saline.
References in periodicals archive ?
A role for AQP5 in activation of TRPV4 by hypotonicity: concerted involvement of AQP5 and TRPV4 in regulation of cell volume recovery.
The patient in the second scenario is post-operative, a common risk factor for hypotonicity. She is showing signs of being in a hypotonic state as evidenced by her lethargy, edematous extremities, hyponatremia, and decreasing BUN and creatinine.
In another study, [TRPV4.sub.P19S] was reported as a DN channel in transfected HEK cells in response to weak but not strong hypotonicity (Tian et al.
This suggests hypotonicity may be a factor that decreases resting energy expenditure (Bauer et al., 2003).
This work was aimed at investigating the effect of the ethanol extract of coconut on egg albumin induced inflammation and gastric mucosal damage induced by indomethacin on Wistar albino rats, and the membrane stabilization ability of the extract on hypotonicity induced haemolysis of red blood cells.
Initial trials tested the effect of hypotonicity on both cell lines.
The last three chapters discuss activities that can be incorporated in the management of children with hypotonicity or delayed sensory motor development and include activities for reflex integration and manipulative activities.
Haemolysis occurred in two patients and this was attributed to the hypotonicity of the solution (2).
The cytoplasmic granules exhibit constant, Brownian motion, due to swelling of the neutrophil--a result of hypotonicity. As a result, the cell shows a shining or glittering appearance and is referred to as a "glitter cell." They are especially striking when viewed with phase-contrast illumination.
Thus, central effects are delayed in onset and prolonged in duration and include acute psychotic reactions, hallucinations, confusion, dizziness, stupor, ataxia, hypotonicity, seizures, and coma.
Study I(b) investigated, in the absence of added saponin, whether incomplete hemolysis (seen with increasing diluent/lysate pH) is a function of pH per se or whether it is attributable to the decreased hypotonicity of diluents to which NaOH was added during pH adjustment.