hypovolemia

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Related to hypovolaemia: hypervolaemia, hypovolemia

hypovolemia

[‚hī·pō‚vä′lē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Low blood volume.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) Biochemical severity (a) Mild hyponatremia, 130-135 mmol/L (b) Moderate hyponatremia, 125-129 mmol/L (c) Profound hyponatremia, <125 mmol/L (2) Time of onset (a) Acute hyponatremia <48 hours (b) Chronic hyponatremia >48 hours (3) Symptoms (a) Symptomatic hyponatremia (b) Asymptomatic hyponatremia (4) Volume status (a) Hypovolaemia (b) Normovolaemia (c) Hypervolaemia (5) Serum osmolality (a) Hypotonic hyponatremia, <275 mOsm/kg (b) Isotonic hyponatremia, 275-295 mOsm/kg (c) Hypertonic hyponatremia, >295 mOsm/kg Table 4: Assessment of volume status.
Our concern is that the delay in manual fluid replacement results in episodic hypovolaemia as it is always "behind" the previous hours output.
Hahn, "The effect of positive end-expiratory pressure and tripled tidal volume on pleth variability index during hypovolaemia in conscious subjects: a volunteer study," European Journal of Anaesthesiology, vol.
Groeneveld, "Greater cardiac response of colloid than saline fluid loading in septic and non-septic critically ill patients with clinical hypovolaemia," Intensive Care Medicine, vol.
Patients with severe pregnancy induced hypertension, hypovolaemia, obese, infection on back, cardiac or respiratory disease and vertebral anomaly were excluded.
(11.) Bliacheriene F, Machado SB, Fonseca EB, Otsuke D, Auler JO Jr, Michard E Pulse pressure variation as a tool to detect hypovolaemia during pneumoperitoneum.
Exclusion criteria were the following: previous history of stroke, previous episode of rehabilitation, medical instability, history of other neurologic disease, amputation, severe disabling arthritis, haemodialysis treatment, atrial fibrillation, left bundle brunch block or hypovolaemia. Demographic variables, age at the time of admission, gender and stroke onset-admission interval, duration of inpatient rehabilitation, side of lesion (dominant or non-dominant side involvement) and type of stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic) were recorded.
The clinician can now utilise ultrasound to further diagnose possible causes of cardiac arrest, which include cardiac tamponade, tension pneumothorax, hypovolaemia and pulmonary embolism.
Two days after discharge, she was re-admitted with signs and symptoms of hypovolaemia. Echocardiogram and computed tomography (CT) confirmed cardiac tamponade.
The management of Addison's disease is focused mainly on the correction of hypovolaemia and electrolyte imbalances with adequate amounts of intravenous fluids, the correction of hypoglycaemia, long-term glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement and the management of underlying causes.
Blood pressure is a measurement produced by cardiac output and vascular resistance, and can aid in the diagnosis of hypovolaemia and resulting hypotension (McArthur-Rouse & Prosser 2007).
Besides the effects of encephalopathic toxins themselves, a series of metabolic alterations may act in synergy, worsening those effects, as azotemia, hypoxia, electrolyte imbalance, hypoglycemia, alkalosis and hypovolaemia. Patients presenting these abnormalities are predisposed to develop encephalopathy and the correction of those conditions often improves encephalopathic symptoms (DUARTE & USHIKOSHI, 2005).