hypovolemia


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hypovolemia

[‚hī·pō‚vä′lē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Low blood volume.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most probable cause of hyponatremia is thought to be the non-osmotic release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) as a result of various clinical conditions, such as fever, hypovolemia, and respiratory tract infections (16,17,5)
FLEXBUMIN 25% is indicated for hypovolemia, hypoalbuminemia, (burns, Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome, and nephrosis), cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, and hemolytic disease of the newborn.
The first one was a large study conducted in intensive care patients, treatment of acute hypovolemia with colloids was not associated with increased 28 day mortality, and even better 90 day survival, as compared to crystalloids (5).
Hypovolemia is a very frequent clinical situation in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), for which the rapid fluid infusion is applied as treatment.
The authors of the study suggest that vitamin D3 may be of clinical importance in the restoration of dysfunctional cardiac endothelium after heart attack, capillary endothelium after brain ischemia (stroke), hypovolemia, vasculopathy, diabetes and atherosclerosis.
From the very first sentence of the new ACOG practice bulletin, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is redefined as "cumulative blood loss greater than or equal to 1,000 mL or blood loss accompanied by signs or symptoms of hypovolemia within 24 hours after the birth process (includes intrapartum loss) regardless of route of delivery." Although this does not seem to be a huge change from the traditional teaching of a 500-mL blood loss at vaginal delivery and a 1,000-mL loss at cesarean delivery, it reflects a shift in focus from simply responding to a certain amount of bleeding to using a multidisciplinary action plan for treating this leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide.
Before the induction of hypovolemia, and after 3 and 6 h of resuscitation, blood samples were withdrawn from arterial catheters for measurement of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-1, and IL-21 concentrations, using porcine-specific ELISA kits for IL-6, IL10, IL-1 and a non-specific kit for IL-21, according to the manufacturer's instructions (R&D Systems, USA).
The lesions over the skin were clearly suggestive of burns and hypovolemia. Lack of appetite, difficulty in prehension and swallowing, impaction of rumen etc.
In Japan, some physicians have insisted that the cause of CSF hypovolemia is traumatic CSF leak, and they call this syndrome traumatic CSF hypovolemia [16].
Although the exact mechanism is unknown, it is highly indicative that CSF hypovolemia causes decrease of intracranial pressure, thereby causing enlargement of dural venous sinuses that becomes an important factor in the pathogenesis of subdural hemorrhage.
Six questions covered pathophysiology, for example, "Which situations can lead to hypovolemia?"; five questions covered symptoms, for example, "What are the two symptoms that can be present during an attack of angina pectoris?"; five questions covered nursing actions, for example "How do you handle an unconscious diabetic patient?"; and two questions covered prioritization of nursing actions, for example, "Range in prioritized order actions with a patient with cardiac arrest." Of the 18 questions, 14 had 4 answer options, where students should mark off 2 correct answers; 2 had 3 answer options, where students should mark off 1 correct answer; and in the last 2 questions students were required to rank 4 answer options.
Physicians should always think of retroperitoneal bleeding in patients presenting with abdominal pain and signs of hypovolemia, especially if they have a bleeding disorder or receive anticoagulants or antiplatelets.