hysterics

(redirected from hysteric)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

hysterics

an attack of hysteria

hysterics

[hi′ster·iks]
(psychology)
Attack of hysteria.
Extreme display of emotions.
References in classic literature ?
Here the spinster aunt burst into fit number two, of hysteric laughter interspersed with screams.
I attribute my being still able to hold the curtain in the right position for looking and listening, entirely to suppressed hysterics.
The Lacedemonian nation might have approved of it, but most modern dames would have gone into hysterics at the sight.
Nelly Arcan, author of Hysteric (originally written and published in French) will kill herself at the age of 36.
It describes the medical context in terms of the practice of castration in the treatment of hysteric women between 1878 and 1895, arguing that this happened to Eckstein and influenced Freud and his theorizing of psychoanalysis, and the theories and practice of Freud between 1895 and 1896 and his position against female castration as a cure for hysteric women, with discussion of the specimen dream of psychoanalysis, the dream of Irma's injection, and how Eckstein's childhood trauma of circumcision caused a psychic reaction in Freud that determined key aspects of his self-analysis and theorizing.
A major radical transformation from the nineteenth-century hysteric to the twenty-first-century posthysteric is a transformation in discourse and, of course, in the agency embedded in that discourse.
Hustvedt analyzes the pros and cons of using photography in this context, explaining that while the photographs were intended to illustrate specific neurological symptoms, they "also inevitably depict the girl," which "compromis[es] their status as medical illustration" (146); she questions, too, how, in the middle of an attack, a hysteric could be transported to a studio, not to mention held still while movie-staresque pictures were taken.
Both the Macedonian and Albanian opposition has been dragged into hysteric outbursts of extremism while the remaining liberal stage is forced to choose.
Medical Muses is not the story of Charcot and his associates alone; it is also about the women whose collaboration enabled their delineation of the hysteric.
It supports the subversive possibilities of the figure of the female hysteric, viewing the hysteric's refusal (or inability) to conform to social expectations as a mode of resistance to the patriarchal system.
The woman writer was thus construed in the dominant male discourse as a figure akin to the prostitute or the hysteric.
In the most unlikely of pairings this side of reality: the Nipponese High Couture salon, Hysteric and the aged Rolling Stones was ostentatious in a fashion-forward sense.