hysterics

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hysterics

an attack of hysteria

hysterics

[hi′ster·iks]
(psychology)
Attack of hysteria.
Extreme display of emotions.
References in classic literature ?
Here the spinster aunt burst into fit number two, of hysteric laughter interspersed with screams.
You'll find out if you work him into a tantrum after this--but at any rate you've given him something to have hysterics about, and I'm glad of it.
I instantly ran into the room, and found Magdalen on the sofa in violent hysterics, and Frank standing staring at her, with a lowering, angry face, biting his nails.
My aunt, with one clap of her hands, and one look through her spectacles, immediately went into hysterics, for the first and only time in all my knowledge of her.
No, no," gasped Gertrude, shrinking into a chair, almost in hysterics.
The moment we were alone in the carriage he gave way to a regular fit of hysterics.
Tell me what it all means," said I, in a state bordering on hysterics.
I frightened him with my passionate affection; I reduced him to tears, to hysterics.
Just then a piercing cry, ending in a sob, burst from the centre of the crowd, who encircled the lady who had before fainted, and who now fell into a violent fit of hysterics.
The day the fleurs de lys were cut out of the medallions of the treasury, and the king laid down his arms, I thought our mistress would have had the hysterics on our account.
The Lacedemonian nation might have approved of it, but most modern dames would have gone into hysterics at the sight.
It was an afternoon of distress, and Anne had every thing to do at once; the apothecary to send for, the father to have pursued and informed, the mother to support and keep from hysterics, the servants to control, the youngest child to banish, and the poor suffering one to attend and soothe; besides sending, as soon as she recollected it, proper notice to the other house, which brought her an accession rather of frightened, enquiring companions, than of very useful assistants.