iKnife

iKnife

(Intelligent KNIFE) A surgical knife that detects cancer cells. In 2013, Dr. Zoltan Takats of Imperial College London connected a commonly used electrosurgical knife, which heats tissue to minimize blood loss, to a spectrometer that analyzes the emanating smoke. The iKnife eliminates cutting out additional good cells to ensure the infected ones were removed.
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Professor Zoltan Takats in London is testing whether an "intelligent knife", known as the iKnife, can tell the difference between normal and cancerous cells during breast cancer surgery.
Ben's operation - which saw his surgeon use a pioneering iKnife, a smart scalpel which can detect cancerous cells - will be shown in quite graphic detail.
A cutting-edge example that illustrates the future of faster results is an experimental surgical knife called the iKnife, which identifies cancerous tissues "on-the-fly." The electrosurgical knife produces a vapor containing ionized molecules, and the vapor is sent to a mass spectrometer.
It is the empowering technology for the "Intelligent Knife" or "iKnife", a device in the conceptual phase of development that has the potential to be used for real-time diagnostics in surgery, the buyer noted.
Real-Time Diagnostics in the Operating Room - the intelligent surgical knife, iKnife, uses an electrical current to heat tissue to make incisions with minimal blood loss.
"Growing infrastructure in information and communications technology, including mobile-broadband networks, along with social media, innovative applications and falling prices for services continue to drive Internet uptake in all regions" "The new "iKnife" is designed to get round the problem by instantly sampling the smoke given off as tissue is cut through using an electric current to see if it is cancerous"
Currently, removed tissue can be sent for laboratory analysis while the patient remains under general anesthetic - but each test takes around half an hour, while the iKnife provides feedback in less than three seconds.
The new tool, called the iKnife, delivers a diagnosis in 2.5 seconds or less, researchers report July 17 in Science Translational Medicine.
In the first study to test the invention in the operating theatre, the "iKnife" diagnosed tissue samples from 91 patients with 100 per cent accuracy, instantly providing information that normally takes up to half an hour to reveal using laboratory tests.
A 16-year-old boy, who was from London but had been staying in Ely, Cambridgeshire, until recently, and a 41-year-old man, from Kings Lynn, were found dead in separate lakes at the pits | WEDNESDAY JULY 17: A surgeon demonstrating the iKnife - an intelligent scalpel which knows when it is cutting through cancerous tissue.