ice accretion

ice accretion

[′īs ə‚krē·shən]
(hydrology)
The process by which a layer of ice builds up on solid objects which are exposed to freezing precipitation or to supercooled fog or cloud droplets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ice buildup may be within tolerance for a time, but it only takes a few short minutes for ice accretion to become extreme and urgent.
During the course of the first flight, the OID successfully detected numerous ice accretion events.
Bank angle plus ice accretion would have given the airplane a higher stall speed.
In addition, another possible issue is the built-up of ice accretion if partially frozen or super-cooled droplets impinged on the facility walls.
Contributions come from a variety of organizations including NASA, Boeing Aircraft, and Pennsylvania State University, and address aspects of the issue such as fluid dynamics, observational technology, hydrophobic coatings, interaction of meteorological conditions with wing shapes, and a variety of ice accretion test methods.
Two environmental factors allow Rock Sandpipers to inhabit Cook Inlet during winter: 1) an abundant bivalve (Macoma balthica) food source and 2) current and tidal dynamics that keep foraging substrates accessible during all but extreme periods of cold and ice accretion.
The third, Ice Accretion and Release in Fuel, got under way at the end of last year and is still in progress.
Thus, in comparison with the smooth LDPE coating and superhydrophobic LDPE coating with high sliding angle, the superhydrophobic LDPE coating with low sliding angle can effectively mitigate the ice accretion.
When the aircraft is in cruise flight, it has a slightly positive angle of attack that exposes a minimum amount of the wing lower surface to ice accretion.
However, the Antarctic ice mass has a much more complex story than the 'floating' sea ice of the north as it incorporates a huge amount of land-based ice that indeed shows thickening and ice accretion in part.
The most significant ice accretion, greater than three quarters of an inch, was in an area bounded approximately by Hendersonville and Tryon, NC and Greenville, SC.